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Author Topic: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions  (Read 37024 times)

KingMike

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #60 on: August 08, 2011, 02:50:50 pm »
Localizing isn't really the same as cut content.

Tales of Phantasia GBA also cut out the whole theme song. The US and EU versions cut out "Battle Voice" option from the config menu. But perhaps they just realized it's a mostly redundant option with the Volume Settings menu.
The EU version is the only one that allows skill names to be printed during battle. Though I imagine that is due to the multi-language support (it seems the voices were only dubbed in English), and unfortunately necessitating an ugly font. :P
I'm guessing the Japanese version uses SRAM while the US and EU use Flash, because the Japanese version saves much faster.
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Ryusui

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #61 on: August 08, 2011, 03:42:45 pm »
Another game is Earthbound for the SNES, they localized the crap out of the dialogue.

I fail to see how this is a bad thing. All the best translations are localizations; we shouldn't have to put up with awkward, stilted dialogue because it's purportedly "accurate." I want my translations to flow, not stumble. Or are you the sort that thinks Breath of Fire 2's "accurate" translation is something to aspire to?
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Chpexo

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« Reply #62 on: August 08, 2011, 05:52:32 pm »
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« Last Edit: January 01, 2016, 11:32:41 am by Chpexo »

Carnivol

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #63 on: August 08, 2011, 06:02:38 pm »
Tales of Phantasia GBA also cut out the whole theme song.

Funny little bit of detail; the tune they replaced Yume wa Owaranai (or however it's spelled) with is the track "Raising the Curtain" (or whatever) - one of the world map themes from the game. Incidentally, this is also the same tune used as the opening theme for the GBC sequel Tales of Phantasia: Narikiri Dungeon.

Yes, I believe that accurate translations are a good thing. I want to get what Japan gets and get a sense of their culture. With localization, you have one mindset of one culture.

A problem with "accurate" translations and that bolded bit (to me, anyway) is that you technically already have to have a "sense of their culture" and "understand their train of thought" to kinda twist your head around why some things are the way they are (if the localization process hasn't been too heavy and the content itself is just a straight up "accurate" translation), and if you've already got that bit nailed down... you're most likely able to wrap your mind around those kind of changes in the average run-off-the-mill localization too and accurately guesstimate how things originally were handled (pre-loc)

Ryusui

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #64 on: August 08, 2011, 06:19:18 pm »
The problem is that localization has been unfairly conflated with bowdlerization for quite some time. There's nothing wrong with taking a few liberties with a story written in Japanese in order to make it shine in English; it's just that the most famous (or infamous) cases tend to be the gruesome Saturday Morning hackjobs 4Kids is known for.

Me, I wouldn't have minded "Joey Wheeler" and whatnot if they could've been trusted to get the damn story right. >_<#
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9volt Kappa

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #65 on: August 08, 2011, 06:33:12 pm »
Yes, I believe that accurate translations are a good thing. I want to get what Japan gets and get a sense of their culture. With localization, you have one mindset of one culture.
Then learn japanese :P

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #66 on: August 08, 2011, 08:13:06 pm »
The problem is that localization has been unfairly conflated with bowdlerization for quite some time. There's nothing wrong with taking a few liberties with a story written in Japanese in order to make it shine in English; it's just that the most famous (or infamous) cases tend to be the gruesome Saturday Morning hackjobs 4Kids is known for.

Oh, pffft. 4Kids. Go watch Cardcaptors. :|

(Then there's Woolsey and the effects he's had on the translation scene. I mean...he was awesome for the era, but clinging to his localizations is a bit silly, don't you think?)

Gideon Zhi

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #67 on: August 08, 2011, 09:14:53 pm »
(Then there's Woolsey and the effects he's had on the translation scene. I mean...he was awesome for the era, but clinging to his localizations is a bit silly, don't you think?)

I'd actually argue that he and, to a lesser extent Victor Ireland, are probably the most important people of early localization. They showed that it could be so much more than it was, especially given the various restraints placed on Woolsey.

Ryusui

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #68 on: August 08, 2011, 11:24:10 pm »
I'll take Woolsey's school of thinking over the one that insists that anything that can't be precisely rendered in English should just be left in Japanese. I've mellowed out about honorifics over the years (Persona 4 and FLCL show they can be handled well), but I've seen random untranslated Japanese seeping into published translations. That's a phenomenon I'd like to see nipped in the bud if at all possible.

And another thing: music. I've heard that 4Kids' dub of Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D's is better than their usual fare, but nothing they could possibly do can make up for the fact that this epic scene won't have its proper soundtrack. (Assuming they make it that far, anyway. I've heard they're just gonna skip over it and start dubbing ZEXAL.)
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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #69 on: August 09, 2011, 01:06:21 am »
I just realized what the D stands for in “4kids dub”! DON’T WATCH IT. [/jokethatsbeensaidamillionways]
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Kirby115

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #70 on: August 09, 2011, 03:32:38 am »
I just realized what the D stands for in “4kids dub”! DON’T WATCH IT. [/jokethatsbeensaidamillionways]
Maybe it's my dirty mind, but I always thought he meant the D was something you wouldn't want to see, so don't watch it. I didn't know he literally meant the D in "Don't".
(He being the pharaoh in Yu-Gi-Oh! The Abridged Series, referring to Yu-Gi-Oh! 5D's).

Kiyoshi Aman

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #71 on: August 09, 2011, 08:37:13 am »
I'd actually argue that he and, to a lesser extent Victor Ireland, are probably the most important people of early localization. They showed that it could be so much more than it was, especially given the various restraints placed on Woolsey.

Well, like I said, he was awesome for his era. I don't think that that is a good reason to cling to his translations today, though—which was my original point.

I'll take Woolsey's school of thinking over the one that insists that anything that can't be precisely rendered in English should just be left in Japanese. I've mellowed out about honorifics over the years (Persona 4 and FLCL show they can be handled well), but I've seen random untranslated Japanese seeping into published translations. That's a phenomenon I'd like to see nipped in the bud if at all possible.

I'm not sure why this is even a thing—nobody who isn't a weeaboo is going to prefer literal translations over one that carries the concepts and personalities over while making the story more palatable to an American audience. Even Sky Render's admitted he was an idiot during his literal-translations-are-the-best phase.

bobonga

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #72 on: August 09, 2011, 08:39:02 am »
http://web.archive.org/web/20091026192519/http://geocities.com/tuffydabubba/

Final Fantasy Tactics had awesome visual-novel sidestories/minigames in the Japanese version but they were removed from the English version for some reason.

They were also removed in the PSP remake despite the fact they retranslated everything else, AND they are still missing in the recent iPhone port  :banghead:

Eien Ni Hen

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #73 on: August 09, 2011, 04:53:25 pm »
I've mellowed out about honorifics over the years (Persona 4 and FLCL show they can be handled well), but I've seen random untranslated Japanese seeping into published translations. That's a phenomenon I'd like to see nipped in the bud if at all possible.

I'm curious. Do you have any examples of this, other than the use of honorific suffixes and Japan-specific things (like sushi)? I'm used to seeing random untranslated Japanese in fan translations, but not in professional work. I thought it was a cardinal rule of professional translation that almost nothing is left in the original language, if at all possible. A lot of the translated novels I've read even leave the suffixes out...

And I'm not even touching the whole literal translation vs. localization debate. That horse died a long time ago, and there's no use in beating it.  :P
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Ryusui

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #74 on: August 09, 2011, 05:33:25 pm »
There are two works I'd like to cite as "influential" in my attitude towards translation: Tokyopop's release of .hack//Legend of the Twilight, and Dark Horse's release of Trigun.

Basically, both translations were made under the assumption that gratuitous honorific use was a viable substitute for writing quality. .hack was rife with outright mistakes that anyone playing the first game for all of fifteen minutes would've caught, and my personal breaking point with Trigun - beyond things like "sempai" and "Legato-sama" in a sci-fi Wild West setting - was when the translator felt compelled to wedge a paragraph-long dictionary definition of "lolicon" next to a panel in order to excuse its use when "pedo" would have sufficed.

Why do these people inflict such injuries on the English language? Why do they insist that the perfect Japanese translation should read like a schizophrenic See Spot Run? Have they utterly forgotten what good writing sounds like? Do they have no concept that their work is supposed to entertain, not leave violent wounds on the language centers of the brain?

The thing that terrifies me is the vicious cycle that's being perpetuated. Crappy translations breed crappy fans; crappy fans breed crappy translations. I blame needless content editing, the knee-jerk reaction to which has been to throw the baby out with the bathwater: localization has been conflated with bowdlerization to the point that such non-translations are considered some sort of ideal. My recent experiences with Liar Game have done nothing to change my opinion. I can rationalize "Samue," I can rationalize "Gaya," but what I can't rationalize is "Steal-a-Chair Game." WHAT THE HELL KIND OF DEPRIVED EXISTENCE DOES TDX HAVE THAT HE CAN'T @#$%ING RECOGNIZE MUSICAL CHAIRS WHEN HE SEES IT?!? *von Karma facewalls*
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Eien Ni Hen

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #75 on: August 09, 2011, 06:29:22 pm »
Wow, that does sound bad.  :o I think I look to novels as a basis for "good" translation habits and tend to ignore manga, as some professionally-done manga I've seen is pretty damn terrible (especially the older stuff).

Of course, it's important to learn what not to do as a translator by seeing others' mistakes and eventually developing your own translation style. So those crappy translations you encountered were at least useful in a way, no?

Also, you should calm down and take some deep breaths. Your post makes it sound like your head's about to explode. You need to live to finish BOF 1. Think happy thoughts.  :D
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Ryusui

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #76 on: August 09, 2011, 06:43:17 pm »
*sigh* Yeah. They were incredibly useful. Having my own hypocrisy handed to me on a silver platter was a...transformative experience.

.hack//AI-Buster was better, mind, but it still had its minor gaffes - most notably "Hidden Forbidden Sacred" instead of "Hidden Forbidden Holy Ground." As for their work on the Slayers novels...well, if you ignore a minor bowdlerization in the first volume and the inconsistent romanizations throughout, those were excellent. It's a shame they never got past volume 8; hell, it's a shame we don't get more light novels in the U.S.. I'd love to read the rest of Kino's Journey (not "Kino no Tabi"...probably a good thing the original publisher pulled the license from them), and Durarara!'s got my interest.
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Lilinda

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #77 on: August 09, 2011, 07:05:13 pm »
I'm pulling for Dokuro-Chan's novels to get translated.
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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #78 on: August 10, 2011, 12:22:00 am »
While being surprisingly good, I believe the Digimon Card Battle game on the Playstation might have been better
if they kept the songs "Butterfly", "Brave Heart", "Target" and "Break On".
I ignore if the song are still or not inside the U.S. version game data.

Ryusui

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Re: Japanese games with content cut for the USA versions
« Reply #79 on: August 10, 2011, 02:08:29 am »
Like I said: missing music drives me nuts. Especially since the replacement tracks are never as good as the original - although I will concede one exception.

I'm well aware "Pray" is the leitmotif of Digital Devil Saga: Avatar Tuner, but "Danger" just fits the visuals so much better. ^_^;
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