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What engine was Earthbound (SNES) created in?

Started by McKnight, May 26, 2022, 06:11:57 AM

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McKnight

Does anyone know?  Just tried to google, but to no avail.

SylarDean

That's quite hard information to find BUT there seems to be a few Earthbound replicas being pumped out if you are looking to make your own Earthbound-like game..

Godot Engine..
https://godotengine.org/

There's also a few other engines that have been specifically tweaked so you can create Earthbound-like type games..

Game Maker Studio (link to the stuff in description)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qv9wpwR27T8

RPG Maker VX Ace
https://secure.fangamer.com/forum/Fan/Games/EarthBound-Mother-3-Engine-RPG-Maker-VX-Ace

Jorpho

What sort of answer are you looking for?  Can you name any other SNES games that use an "engine"?

Generally it only makes sense to refer to such things when different games use some sort of a common codebase.  Marvelous is said to use the Link to the Past "engine", though I'm not sure if that means they actually have code in common or if they just closely resemble each other. (The Secret of Evermore resembles Secret of Mana, but was in fact rewritten from scratch.) Something like the SNES has such limited resources as to not be able to afford the overhead of an "engine" using non-specific code.

In any case, there's nothing I've heard of that can be said to reuse code from Earthbound.
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FAST6191

Quote from: Jorpho on May 26, 2022, 10:11:08 AM
What sort of answer are you looking for?  Can you name any other SNES games that use an "engine"?

Generally it only makes sense to refer to such things when different games use some sort of a common codebase.  Marvelous is said to use the Link to the Past "engine", though I'm not sure if that means they actually have code in common or if they just closely resemble each other. (The Secret of Evermore resembles Secret of Mana, but was in fact rewritten from scratch.) Something like the SNES has such limited resources as to not be able to afford the overhead of an "engine" using non-specific code.

In any case, there's nothing I've heard of that can be said to reuse code from Earthbound.

I don't disagree and find the question of minimal practical use, even more so if we are to use engine in the doom/quake/unreal/... modern sense of the term. I similarly know little of the SNES library when all is said and done but the NES would be said to have things share enough code to count here even if we ignore reskins a la doki doki panic/mario and even shared audio cores. To that end I could see such a thing make some sense for the SNES and what little we have seen of source code leaks and ports over the years could speak to something more. What practical value for anything around here that might amount to compared to say PS1 on up and PC of slightly earlier on up when look at http://wiki.xentax.com/index.php/Game_File_Format_Central https://wiki.multimedia.cx/index.php?title=Category:Game_Formats and go from there becomes a possibility I don't know as most things 16 bit and older tend to be islands unto themselves give or take the basically an expansion pack 1 year later sequels.

KingMike

For such low power and memory capabilities of the hardware, it wouldn't make sense to just blindly reuse an "engine" written by someone else.

At most, we'd see one developer/publisher reusing their own "engine".
The only sort of thing we could see is like Capcom's level-pack sequels (like the Mega Man and Disney games).
(or a worse example, Imagineering who used the same crappy engine to sell Bartman Meets Radioactive Man to Acclaim and Swamp Thing to THQ on the NES. Or Beam's Tom & Jerry Game Boy game. I think they got a little mileage repurposing that game.)
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DragonAtma

They released an RPG Maker game for the SNES, so at least one engine was used for multiple games! XD

On a more serious note, we're probably underestimating how many game engines were created. Even if games aren't as obviously related like the Mega Man games, I'm sure there was at least some code reuse in many cases.
Quote from: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_engineA notable example of an in-house game engine on home consoles in the mid-1980s was the smooth side-scrolling engine developed by Shigeru Miyamoto's team at Nintendo for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). The engine they had developed for the side-scrolling racing game Excitebike (1984) was later employed for the scrolling platformer Super Mario Bros. (1985). This had the effect of allowing Mario to smoothly accelerate from a walk to a run, rather than move at a constant speed like in earlier platformers.[7]

And that doesn't count inter-company assistance.
Quote from: https://lparchive.org/Solaris/Update%2015/We know for a fact that Atari's internal developers shared tricks with each other—the six-digit score trick was apparently the "Dave Staugus score kernel" there, after the programmer who worked it out—and once it was devised, everyone used it. It was a hardware upgrade for everyone.

True, they're not 100% matches, but I'm sure there are more SNES game engines that we realize.
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