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Author Topic: Psycho Dream (SFC) - Translation Hack  (Read 1024 times)

BitCloud88

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« Last Edit: January 25, 2021, 12:10:03 pm by BitCloud88 »

KingMike

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Re: Psycho Dream (SFC) - Translation Hack
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2021, 09:51:03 am »
Old console games rarely store their game text in ASCII.
Let alone the chance of UTF.

How do you know if it's text or graphics?

Typically you work backwards.
Get a savestate of the screen. (the reason I still keep ZSNES is because it uses uncompressed savestates. And also to combine with WindHex, which hides the ZSNES CPU data, so I can see actual VRAM offsets)
Then open it in a tile editor. If you can see the full text displayed among the graphics, then it's probably a graphic. If you can only see the font (characters not duplicated), it's probably a font.

Then use a debugging emulator to figure out where and how that data was loaded from.
"My watch says 30 chickens" Google, 2018

BitCloud88

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« Last Edit: January 25, 2021, 12:10:16 pm by BitCloud88 »

KingMike

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Re: Psycho Dream (SFC) - Translation Hack
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2021, 06:58:04 pm »
Which tile editors are you using?

When I mentioned WindHex, it automatically recognizes ZSTs and hides the CPU data (which is the first 0xC13 bytes in the file) and then after that is 0x20000 bytes WRAM, 0x10000 bytes VRAM and 0x10000 bytes APU RAM.

If you are using a different tile editor you will have to manually scroll to the right address ($C13) to see the start of the RAM data. (I am pretty sure I remember that magic number correctly.)
If you can find your matching data within WRAM (the first $20000 bytes, or would be $20C13-40C12), then it is easier to trace, since you can look for the routine copying it to WRAM.

Also, it looks like graphics are stored in a lower bitdepth. For SNES, the tile editor is probably defaulting to 4bpp, but 2bpp is more commonly used. It might even be 1bpp. You will have to find the key for your tile editor to adjust that so it looks right.
"My watch says 30 chickens" Google, 2018

BitCloud88

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« Last Edit: January 25, 2021, 12:10:26 pm by BitCloud88 »