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Favorite flavor of Linux?

Started by pianohombre, April 02, 2018, 05:44:12 PM

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pianohombre

I remember several flavors of Linux have been popular. Red Hat, Ubuntu, and some others I can't remember. I have Ubuntu installed and it works pretty good, except of course most developers don't have Linux supported apps. Sometimes I have to open the terminal and install programs. It's such a hassle compared to Windows to install programs.
"Programming in itself is beauty,
whether or not the operating system actually functions." - Steve Wozniak

Bonesy

lubuntu is nice, if you want arch go manjaro

Kiyoshi Aman

If you want to run Linux on old hardware, I'd recommend Adelie. Requires manual installation, but the instructions are pretty straightforward. Note that if you need firmware to use particular bits of hardware, you'll need to install linux-firmware from APK Fission's nonfree repo.

We have KDE 5, LXQt (recommended for older hardware), openbox, and fluxbox, as well as Firefox or, more suitable for older hardware, Otter browser.

Jorpho

Quote from: pianohombre on April 02, 2018, 05:44:12 PMSometimes I have to open the terminal and install programs.

This is likely to be an inevitable part of the Linux experience.

Linux Mint was all the rage a few years ago, but the winds may have shifted again.
This signature is an illusion and is a trap devisut by Satan. Go ahead dauntlessly! Make rapid progres!

Bregalad

There is no such thing a a "flavor" of linux. I don't know wher you got the idea such a thing ever existed.

If you mean "desktop" or something like that ?
KDE is rather nice but is bloated, Cinnamon is nice and closer to Windows in how it works, so I use either of those two. I don't like the other desktops much.

FAST6191

Quote from: Bregalad on April 04, 2018, 04:13:33 PM
There is no such thing a a "flavor" of linux. I don't know wher you got the idea such a thing ever existed.

If you mean "desktop" or something like that ?
KDE is rather nice but is bloated, Cinnamon is nice and closer to Windows in how it works, so I use either of those two. I don't like the other desktops much.

Flavour is a pretty common slang term for variation, one I see used often enough with such things. In this case it would stand for distro/distribution.

Anyway my usual policy is
Is it on https://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major ?
If not then you had better have a very good reason for wanting to use it.
If it is then read what it is about and go from there.

Speaking of reading what it is about then I kind of downplay whatever I am using as I am not you, and as such we probably have very different needs.

As most computing use can be handled with a web browser these days, and the office program (assuming it too is not in the browser) and media player are mostly interchangeable, then you have many choices. Bonus with everybody being used to phones/tablets then you also don't have as many problems with people memorising sequences of icons any more.

I kind of like Linux Mint for general people -- it is kind of the best of ubuntu and debian, most fixes for those apply to that, as do the packages. They are also
Faster is better so I will tend to go for the lighter desktop environments like XFCE (can do more minimal ones still but eh really) -- I always remember seeing compiz (or one of its forks) many years ago and thinking it is pretty but why would I want that?

pianohombre

I have an old version of Ubuntu installed. Looks like in April 2018 there's a new LTS version. Hopefully it will upgrade without too much hassle.
"Programming in itself is beauty,
whether or not the operating system actually functions." - Steve Wozniak

Bregalad

Quote from: FAST6191 on April 04, 2018, 05:17:03 PM
Flavour is a pretty common slang term for variation, one I see used often enough with such things. In this case it would stand for distro/distribution.
When it comes to distribution my opinion is that it doesn't matter all that much, the main difference is the package manager, and where system files are/how it is organized.

I've used Debian and Archlinux which are both great - Debian has the largest software available typically. BUT sometimes you'll encounter software only available as a binary RPM, and then trying to convert it to a Debian package is futile, so using Fedora is the only viable alternative.

So yeah it really depends on which software you want to run.

Jorpho

Quote from: Bregalad on April 09, 2018, 02:40:55 AMBUT sometimes you'll encounter software only available as a binary RPM, and then trying to convert it to a Debian package is futile, so using Fedora is the only viable alternative.
Wasn't there a program called Alien that can be used to convert RPMs to DEB?  Or does that not work very well?

In any case, I would think one of the other derivatives of Fedora (like CentOS) might be preferable.
This signature is an illusion and is a trap devisut by Satan. Go ahead dauntlessly! Make rapid progres!

Bregalad

Quote from: Jorpho on April 09, 2018, 06:46:06 PM
Wasn't there a program called Alien that can be used to convert RPMs to DEB?  Or does that not work very well?
Precisely, in the case of a particular piece of software I had to use which was RPM only, it did not work at all.

Kiyoshi Aman

Binary-only software is a blight, and should generally be avoided.

If there's software you need which is only available as a binary and not shipped solely as RPM/DEB, feel free to post it here and, if possible, I will test it against Adelie's gcompat support library.

Bregalad

Quote from: Kiyoshi Aman on April 11, 2018, 10:45:15 PM
Binary-only software is a blight, and should generally be avoided.

If there's software you need which is only available as a binary and not shipped solely as RPM/DEB, feel free to post it here and, if possible, I will test it against Adelie's gcompat support library.
That software in quesiton I was mentionning is Lattice Diamond. I agree binary-only software should be avoided, but in this case there's no alternative, as far as I know it's impossible to develop for any programmable logic with open source software for now (let alone free software, whose requirements are even higher than open source).