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Author Topic: How to increase interest in hacking?  (Read 53286 times)

Seihen

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #120 on: March 09, 2016, 06:50:09 pm »
- Have the emulator scan the CHR-RAM for characters which are Japanese. Alternatively, allow the user to designate areas of CHR-RAM that are Japanese. When these characters are blitted to the background, copy their romanji to a buffer. Compare the romanji with a list of words which correspond to kanji, then do a phrase search based on the kanji and dump the matches whenever the sentence ends.

The lynchpin of this approach lies in the fact that there are Kanji equivalents for most katakana phrases and all hiragana/classical words. While it is difficult to match a stream of syllables to english, it is not difficult to match kanji to English. This approach is not meant to replace the hacking end of things, but to relax the burden on the translator. Naturally fluency in Japanese is still needed for RPGs because direct Japanese-to-English conversion is impossible particularly as regards conversational Japanese.

Sorry to jump into this conversation, but I just had to point out a severe flaw with this approach. Kanji->romaji->kanji->english will never properly work because of several key issues that might not be obvious.

1.  Kanji has more than one reading
The nightmare of all students learning Japanese is that not only are there over 2,000 characters to learn (if you plan on reading books or newspapers, that 2,000 number everyone tells you is useless), but each character has several different readings. And each reading changes the meaning.

Ex. 行く (iku; go), 行う (okonau; do); 上がる (agaru; to rise), 上る (noboru; to ascend (stairs))
行った... could be past tense of "to go" OR past tense of "to do." No way of knowing without context.

2. Kanji meanings change when attached to other kanji

Many kanji have a meaning on their own which is different (or modified) when it is attached to another kanji. This is obvious in sentences to a reader, but not necessarily obvious where to cut things into chunks to a machine.

Ex. 大人 (otona; adult), 人気 (ninki; popular)
How about 大人気? Usually it's read as 大 人気 (daininki; very popular) but an alternate reading is 大人 気 (otonage; adult-like).

3. Many romanized/hiragana readings can convert into several different kanji

Perhaps the biggest issue is that if you were to romanize and then do a kanji lookup, you'll run into the issue that many (MANY) kanji have the same reading, and without context it's impossible to tell which one is intended.

Ex. 経つ, 立つ, 建つ, 絶つ, 断つ (tatsu; (time) passes, to stand, a building is constructed, cease (living, breathing), stop  (smoking, drinking))

So... just wanted to throw out some of the challenges facing any form of automated translation from the language side, not to mention the technical difficulties.

zonk47

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #121 on: March 10, 2016, 06:25:29 pm »
As you say, these are challenges... not impossibilities.

There are ways to model context. For one thing, most RPGs rely on medieval terminology, which has very few contexts. (The beauty of Japanese script is that mankind is defined within it) Most game script revolves around these timeless idioms, emotions, and circumstances.

Of course pattern recognition has limits. Every one-trick pony does.

Pattern recognition throws grammar out the window. In grammar, you have subjects, direct objects, and indirect objects which are kept in mind by conversationalists over the course of conversation. These are easily identified, even more so in Japanese than English due to the use of particles.

On BASIC and its' supposed inferiority and bugginess:
Some people have alleged that Visual BASIC is inferior to Visual C because it's buggier. Would like to see some hard evidence of this. Personally I find BASIC, visual or not, many times easier to deal with than C. For one thing, object overloading becomes confusing, makes many C++ programs languages unto themselves. For another: MAKE. Don't get me started there. I think MAKE turns people off from C++ more than anything else... many people refuse to try to learn it because they know that they have to deal with MAKE. Finally, the interpretation burden. I have no difficulty making sense of well-written BASIC. C/++/# on the other hand, even when well written, requires deep concentration to make sense of. C also seems to promote shorthand variable names which make code less self-documenting. And if you're going to make an open-source program, you have responsibility to make the code as readable as possible. Else you aren't offering anything of value (to programmers) because it will be less trouble for people to write their own program from scratch than to wrap their heads around yours (because while the actual amount of time spent hacking said program for a specific functionality might ultimately be proved probably less than the time to rewrite it all, it is nonetheless uncertain at the outset, where the time frame for writing a program with duplicate functionality can be estimated). Additionally, there is a bad attitude in this community towards people who struggle with program logic. Facts about hardware I/O and memory maps are imparted without argument, but when someone has difficulty actually implementing a function for an emulator/debugger, there tends to be irritation, some of it justified particularly because, when C is your language, it's very difficult to resist the temptation to try to put someone else up to doing it, because you know it's going to take a long time. You either like C, or you hate it. While this is also true of BASIC, there is the caveat that while some may hate BASIC, they can nonetheless understand it, whereas many hate C because they find it a struggle to use. Someone said something about not wanting to attract BASIC programmers. That attitude is incomprehensible to me, for several reasons. While it may be true that people who prefer BASIC have less talent as programmers than people who prefer C, there is nonetheless a much larger pool of them, and they tend to be more enthusiastic. Additionally, BASIC, with its GOSUBs and GOTOs, is actually more like ASM than C is (at least on the surface), so it's not a huge learning curve for someone who is familiar with QB64 to start working in Z80 or 6502. In summary: the community is likely to grow if we push BASIC as the language for developing debugging tools.
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Revenant

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #122 on: March 10, 2016, 08:27:22 pm »
Some people have alleged that Visual BASIC is inferior to Visual C because it's buggier.

I think far more often the issues is not that it's buggier, but that it's specifically designed for simplicity at the expense of flexibility (and performance). There are good reasons why literally no systems code in existence is written in any BASIC dialect.

(Also, "Visual C" is not a thing that exists. I assume you meant Visual C++, which is a development environment, not a language.)

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Personally I find BASIC, visual or not, many times easier to deal with than C. For one thing, object overloading becomes confusing, makes many C++ programs languages unto themselves.

C and C++ are two different languages.

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For another: MAKE. Don't get me started there. I think MAKE turns people off from C++ more than anything else... many people refuse to try to learn it because they know that they have to deal with MAKE.

Using make is by no means mandatory for C/C++ programming. And if you're using Visual C++ or another similar toolchain as mentioned above, it's probably not even going to be part of the equation. The whole reason IDEs exist is to simplify the development process.

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Finally, the interpretation burden. I have no difficulty making sense of well-written BASIC. C/++/# on the other hand, even when well written, requires deep concentration to make sense of.

I think this depends primarily on how familiar you are with C and its descendants. While C certainly does have more of a learning curve than any given BASIC dialect, there are so many languages that inherit its syntax that a basic understanding is considered a pretty fundamental skill for most programmers to have.

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C also seems to promote shorthand variable names which make code less self-documenting.

No more than any other language does. What's stopping anybody from writing "let a = 5" in BASIC?

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That attitude is incomprehensible to me, for several reasons. While it may be true that people who prefer BASIC have less talent as programmers than people who prefer C, there is nonetheless a much larger pool of them, and they tend to be more enthusiastic.


There is basically no correlation whatsoever between enthusiasm and ability. A reasonably skilled programmer (i.e. a non-beginner) can usually pick up the fundamentals of a new programming language more or less over a weekend.

While modern BASIC dialects may be good for a first language, I would absolutely not recommend it to anyone for any kind of long-term production purposes. It's specifically designed to be a simple language for simple tasks; trying to write something as complex as an emulator or debugger in any flavor of BASIC is going to get hairy and cumbersome fast.

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Additionally, BASIC, with its GOSUBs and GOTOs, is actually more like ASM than C is (at least on the surface), so it's not a huge learning curve for someone who is familiar with QB64 to start working in Z80 or 6502. In summary: the community is likely to grow if we push BASIC as the language for developing debugging tools.

GOSUB is functionally equivalent to a simple function call in nearly any other language, and GOTO is something that also exists in C, with identical functionality (and is also a really bad thing to encourage people to use except when they absolutely know what they're doing).

Aside from those two things, there is basically no meaningful resemblance between any BASIC dialect and any assembly language - and if there was, why would you encourage people to use it as their primary language? The whole reason people use high(er) level languages is because they are ideally as far from assembly programming as possible.

(Meanwhile, C is basically as low-level as it gets when it comes to non-assembly programming languages, to the point where most compilers support inserting assembly code directly into C programs.)

Grimlock

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #123 on: March 10, 2016, 08:43:52 pm »
I stepped away from this thread for a bit and missed the reply's regarding Tile Layer Pro.  I agree with everyone's comments regarding the superior features of TM and YYCR but there is one place where TLP shines and that's with it's tile arranger:

The tile arranger allows you to paint tiles in a window.  You can then edit the tile in the window and have it affect the actual tile in the rom, this is incredibly useful.


Animation editing and creation:








The tile arranger can be used to paint whole scenes in order to test and experiment with graphics:








Here's a few examples where the size of the tile arranger becomes a problem when working with large graphics:




Almost doesn't fit:



There are ways to create graphics and bring them into a ROM with YYCHR but I find with the tile arranger it's sometimes faster than editing in Photoshop and going through the transfer process.  There are some other advantages to using Photoshop but that's outside the scope of this post.

Seihen

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #124 on: March 10, 2016, 09:05:59 pm »
There are ways to model context. For one thing, most RPGs rely on medieval terminology, which has very few contexts. (The beauty of Japanese script is that mankind is defined within it) Most game script revolves around these timeless idioms, emotions, and circumstances.

Of course pattern recognition has limits. Every one-trick pony does.

Pattern recognition throws grammar out the window. In grammar, you have subjects, direct objects, and indirect objects which are kept in mind by conversationalists over the course of conversation. These are easily identified, even more so in Japanese than English due to the use of particles.

I adore the fact that someone who doesn't speak Japanese is somehow qualified to discuss its relative easiness.  :P

zonk47

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #125 on: March 11, 2016, 10:23:30 am »
Revenant, I don't think you know anything about BASIC; at least, nothing about BASIC since 1995...
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Bahamut ZERO

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #126 on: March 11, 2016, 03:56:58 pm »
I stepped away from this thread for a bit and missed the reply's regarding Tile Layer Pro.  I agree with everyone's comments regarding the superior features of TM and YYCR but there is one place where TLP shines and that's with it's tile arranger:

The tile arranger allows you to paint tiles in a window.  You can then edit the tile in the window and have it affect the actual tile in the rom, this is incredibly useful.


Animation editing and creation:








The tile arranger can be used to paint whole scenes in order to test and experiment with graphics:








Here's a few examples where the size of the tile arranger becomes a problem when working with large graphics:




Almost doesn't fit:



There are ways to create graphics and bring them into a ROM with YYCHR but I find with the tile arranger it's sometimes faster than editing in Photoshop and going through the transfer process.  There are some other advantages to using Photoshop but that's outside the scope of this post.



Idk if I mentioned this in this thread or somewhere else, but you can use two roms (one of the rom you're working with and the other being any rom with a large chunk blanked out using the transparent (first) color of a palette) alongside 2 instances of YYCHR to achieve the same effect as a Tile arranger.

I mean, outside of SNES graphics editing TLP would still work just fine since it has ACTUAL tile arranger... but through the YYCHR method I mention you basiically end up with a Tile arranger that you can save and come back to later!  :)
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furrykef

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #127 on: March 11, 2016, 04:41:40 pm »
As you say, these are challenges... not impossibilities.

Suffice it to say that one or two ROM hackers on their lonesome are not going to somehow accomplish what large corporations have been trying to accomplish for decades. Moreover, someone who can develop such an immensely valuable technology is probably not going to waste it by applying it to ROM hacking; they'll be too busy commercializing it. What could actually happen is one of these megacorps somehow finally cracks the problem and the technology eventually becomes accessible to us, at which point we could put it in emulators or something, but by that point the games we play today will probably be a distant memory, or more likely ancient history.

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There are ways to model context. For one thing, most RPGs rely on medieval terminology, which has very few contexts. (The beauty of Japanese script is that mankind is defined within it) Most game script revolves around these timeless idioms, emotions, and circumstances.

You greatly underestimate the role of context in comprehending sentences, especially in a highly context-sensitive language like Japanese. Besides, how does a game being a medieval RPG help you parse "time flies like an arrow"?

Heck, in Japanese, you often need context just to work out where word boundaries are. When I started learning Japanese, even text with spaces was very difficult for me to parse. Now parsing Japanese sentences is usually nearly trivial for me even if I don't actually understand the sentence, but only because I have learned the (mostly subconscious) contextual cues that help me parse. Yet automatic translators, despite having a vocabulary larger than mine ever will be, still can't get it right.

Revenant, I don't think you know anything about BASIC; at least, nothing about BASIC since 1995...

This discussion is getting muddled, since you started with stuff like GOTO and GOSUB, which sound like BASIC from well before 1995. I do think Revenant is a little off base in saying that an emulator would be difficult to develop in VB, though; even ancient versions of VB would probably handle it just fine. (That doesn't mean I still wouldn't much rather code it in C++ or something.) But those dialects of BASIC are pretty far removed from ones where GOTO was common.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2016, 05:36:11 pm by furrykef »

Grimlock

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #128 on: March 11, 2016, 09:26:36 pm »


Idk if I mentioned this in this thread or somewhere else, but you can use two roms (one of the rom you're working with and the other being any rom with a large chunk blanked out using the transparent (first) color of a palette) alongside 2 instances of YYCHR to achieve the same effect as a Tile arranger.

I mean, outside of SNES graphics editing TLP would still work just fine since it has ACTUAL tile arranger... but through the YYCHR method I mention you basiically end up with a Tile arranger that you can save and come back to later!  :)

It sounds like that would work in a lot of situations, the only real issue I would  suspect would be having to sort all those tiles back into the actual game ROM.  I do use your technique in a similar way when I copy graphics into YYCHR from Photoshop.  I use a tile holder ROM and sort the tiles into the actual game ROM from there.  I'm going to try your technique specifically for editing though and see how I like it compared to using TLPs arranger.  If YYCHR had an actual tile arranger you could save that worked as TLPs it really would be pretty fantastic.

dACE

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #129 on: March 12, 2016, 09:42:05 am »
Why not use Tile Molester? That editor can import and export bmp's.
That means that you can use whatever paint program (mspaint) to create tiles and sprites.

/dACE


zonk47

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #130 on: March 12, 2016, 05:33:26 pm »
Suffice it to say that one or two ROM hackers on their lonesome are not going to somehow accomplish what large corporations have been trying to accomplish for decades. Moreover, someone who can develop such an immensely valuable technology is probably not going to waste it by applying it to ROM hacking; they'll be too busy commercializing it. What could actually happen is one of these megacorps somehow finally cracks the problem and the technology eventually becomes accessible to us, at which point we could put it in emulators or something, but by that point the games we play today will probably be a distant memory, or more likely ancient history.

That's the whole problem right there: you've lost your faith in your own intellect. When you lose your faith, the possible becomes impossible.
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furrykef

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #131 on: March 12, 2016, 06:19:50 pm »
And if everyone had your attitude, we'd all be chasing chimeras instead of getting practical stuff done.

zonk47

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #132 on: March 12, 2016, 06:31:17 pm »
And if everyone had your attitude, we'd all be chasing chimeras instead of getting practical stuff done.

True enough, but that doesn't mean you should criticize people for wanting to try. Don't make people choose between your favor and their own ingenuity...
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FAST6191

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #133 on: March 12, 2016, 07:02:03 pm »
History and Nobel prize lists are filled with people that tried something new with a new tech or looked at something a slightly different way (the history of cellotape in such things being a good example), however I am not seeing the scope for a handful of us to crack language processing -- maths, tech, low level science and more are great but percentage wise then nobody cares, everybody wants universal translation. Maybe in a few decades when the storage and computer power at my fingertips are such that I can personally afford some kind of trained database of language, or some human brain emulation that handles such things better. Right now though I have maybe a bunch of multi core machines that rank somewhere in the tens of teraflops at very best, a few gigs of memory and some terabytes of storage if I dedicated the lot. Multiply that by* nine delegates from 100 gangs. And there's over a hundred more. That's 20,000 hardcore members. Forty-thousand, counting affiliates, and twenty-thousand more, not organized, but ready to fight: 60,000 soldiers! the say 200 members on the 20 or so hacking forums of any great size, a bunch more for emulation and flash cart and we maybe have a small-moderate server farm or supercomputer somewhere in the "do we power it or use the money it would take to build a new one?" range.

Equally much of this was not that it is not possible (though there are still serious barriers) but more that the first method proposed was simplistic to the point of near pointlessness.

*we did see some efforts to brute force crypto keys at points which got some people in on things, enough that it formed a not inconsiderable cluster.

There have been things in the past too -- the whole dynamic recompilation thing, a lot of the work done in return oriented programming owes more than a passing nod, rafts of end user driven hardware documentation and systems analysis otherwise seen only in cars and motorbikes (and having a passing acquaintance with car electronics/programming then that world would love some of the stuff we have), some of the general debugging has come back to game/ROM hacking to relearn what might have been temporarily forgotten at times and the list goes on. I don't reckon the halting problem will fall here, however I do reckon something like FPGA programming, or some functional equivalent, will be the next thing brought several levels forward by the emulation and ROM hacking set -- the potential for emulation alone all but guaranteeing that from where I sit. Natural language translation is so one of those things though.

VicVergil

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #134 on: March 13, 2016, 01:07:33 am »
I think I heard about a tool hooking on executables for visual novels, provided they use Shift-JIS to encode the text (though Mother 3 with its custom table had one such tool tailor made for a special VBA build, a shame it wastes it on automatic translation).
It would separate the kanji and give for each one their dictionary definition (or definitions, if homographs exist) in English. It helps but doesn't (and can't) replace someone's fluency in the language totally. That and, well, such a solution would be very, very difficult to implement for kana-only games (there's LOTS of them).

But a better offline OCR (like this one but optimized for pixel fonts and the 700-1100 joyo kanji frequently found in games) for fonts could be an interesting proposition, even for identifying kanji while building tables for the purpose of standard romhacking.

Why not use Tile Molester? That editor can import and export bmp's.
That means that you can use whatever paint program (mspaint) to create tiles and sprites.
/dACE

Tile Molester doesn't have a tile map construction mode like Crystaltile2 and Tile Layer Pro do.
Meaning, anything you'd export would be the disassembled puzzle pieces jumbled together.
Pieces of legs, background structures, heads in different states...

Tile Map window in TLP allows you to reassemble the puzzle to be like how that sprite would appear in-game (the vertical beams and block pieces would form a tall column, the leg/hand/head pieces would form one frame of Mario while running...)
Editing that assembled puzzle (and the changes would be reflected on the jumbled pieces in the original ROM) is far easier than editing those messed up individual pieces directly.

That, and Tile Molester sucks.
Unstable, no copy feature, buggy palette support, dimensions being integer multiple of 8...
An editing feature and proper scrolling and other features for TileGDD would be a godsend.

You either like C, or you hate it. While this is also true of BASIC, there is the caveat that while some may hate BASIC, they can nonetheless understand it, whereas many hate C because they find it a struggle to use. Someone said something about not wanting to attract BASIC programmers. That attitude is incomprehensible to me, for several reasons. While it may be true that people who prefer BASIC have less talent as programmers than people who prefer C, there is nonetheless a much larger pool of them, and they tend to be more enthusiastic. Additionally, BASIC, with its GOSUBs and GOTOs, is actually more like ASM than C is (at least on the surface), so it's not a huge learning curve for someone who is familiar with QB64 to start working in Z80 or 6502. In summary: the community is likely to grow if we push BASIC as the language for developing debugging tools.

I... can't help but feel the contrast a tad bit amusing :D

You want, no, demand people who know C to learn and code in BASIC instead (and advance that programs being open-source is something at odds with using C).
And this bit
Quote
BASIC, with its GOSUBs and GOTOs, is actually more like ASM than C is
is, for the lack of a better word, a mindblowing piece of logic. How can a language as close to human language and as distant from register and variable manipulation (which seem to be the devil for you) be "like ASM"? (Not to mention goto is a thing in C, but I digress)

But at the same time you can't justify the effort for YOU, or the newcomer you're picturing in your examples, to learn C.
Same pattern when it comes to using console prompts.
You deem that the newcomer can't be expected to make the effort.

Another thing, you have many really interesting ideas.
But I have a hunch it would be far more preferable if your proposition had the technical implementation part more thought-up.
I took part in some project like this and had to do most of the algorithm and examine all edge cases for my proposition to be remotely acceptable (or useful) for my programmer friend.

Apologies for being blunt, but getting your hands dirty a bit more in such a priori repugnant aspects for you (learning Japanese, learning C...) should give you the insight you need for your propositions to look feasible technically (or to recognize when it isn't, and what alternate solutions to achieve the same goal can be). Being just an "idea man" doesn't cut it anymore.

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #135 on: March 14, 2016, 05:22:05 am »
No it's not about people refusing to learn C... you know in old computer text books BASIC was presented as a language for beginners, while C was touted as a language only for gifted programmers. FORTRAN was offered as something in between.

No, I am not saying we should write hacking tools in FORTRAN. Actually, from what I've been told by people who were there, BASIC was the preferred language of scientists for many years, moreso than FORTRAN (although there aren't many differences anymore).

The problem with C is not that people can't learn it... it's that it's antagonistic to (most) minds in a way that BASIC isn't. If your mind isn't "suited" to C, you can never manage to read it without having to enter prolonged periods on concentration. Actually the whole "gifted programmer" thing is probably off... people do not do C for fun.. they do it in exchange for something. This thing is pretty much always money or prestige, because C always takes effort. You can't just sit down and start with it, because there is so little it does for you. With C/C++ you have to micromanage everything in a way you don't with BASIC or Java. The micromanagement adds a huge amount of extra time on top of the coding process that you don't have with other high level languages. I remember on Win9x I was afraid to write in C because I knew that if I screwed up my computer would crash. BASIC conversely had a break key, excellent error trapping, and a kill-all command which restored control to the OS without a hitch. Now since WinXP there is more C/C++ development because a crash doesn't kill the system (does on 'Droid, though!).
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FAST6191

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #136 on: March 14, 2016, 06:03:52 am »
"you know in old computer text books" they also said multiple core programming was too hard.
I love old textbooks and pick them up all the time for more traditional fields of science and engineering but for computing that is a risky proposition.

Anyway I do not think it was so much that you wanted a higher level language to be the suggestion of choice (there is some merit to the concept) but that you pegged Basic as the thing to do it with. Basic is a burned bridge as far as most people wanting programs, computers and such and I guess I would even extend that to VB.net, even though the B is probably the main thing making it any kind of Basic. It is better than the line numbers era but I guess it would be like Freudian psychology, which is to say of considerable historical value but anybody advocating using it to do damage today will be laughed out of the room, even with slight refinements.

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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #137 on: March 14, 2016, 09:58:17 pm »
If not BASIC, then what? Java's all but dead... C# as bad as C in some ways? Javascript but its got its own problems.

I don't think we're gonna be able to agree on anything, though, on this topic.
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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #138 on: March 14, 2016, 11:46:41 pm »
I jump late in the conversation but regarding the original question I got a few points, which were already probably all mentioned.

I manage (or try to :P) a game specific ROM hacking forum and I've seen a lot of people over the years dropping by and leaving at their first edit that was outside the GUI editors made for the game. Anything involving a hex editor or worst assembly would frighten them like plague. Can we really adapt to these people who dislike programming and math? Maybe they though ROM hacking was something else and that they could magically make  a hack without too much effort...

While being limited by the range of game hacking our forum discuss, I had ideas about trying to make ROM hacking more accesible:

  • Make a Wiki to regroup information and documents scattered among threads. (There is one on RHDN)
  • Have a general hacking section in wiki with tutorials for beginners. (Hexadecimal notation, hex editor, etc..)
  • Make intermediate tutorials (video or text) on utility features.
  • Make ASM tutorials for beginner and intermediate people;
  • A Youtube channel with video featuring small to major hacks.*
  • A facebook page.*
  • A Reddit group.

* Already attempted but failed due to lack of maintenance.

The first four points have as goal to not discourage people that tries to jump in the scene and bring them to the level of coding or game knowledge where they can learn more advanced concepts by their own (some people does that from beginning though). The last three point would be to draw more people into a glance at the scene and decide if they want to jump in, though I'm a bit skeptic about their potential efficienty.

I don't see places like RHDN, Quhimm Forums or GBAtemp dying though there is always place to improve the accessibility for new people.


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Re: How to increase interest in hacking?
« Reply #139 on: March 15, 2016, 01:59:56 am »
I've studied COBOL in school, dabbled in BASIC, C/C++, C#, and Delphi. I much prefer working in C# with Delphi coming in second.
Current Projects: On hold indefinitely.
I do the Twitter thing now: https://twitter.com/MistressSaeko (expect lots of game streaming announcements)
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