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Author Topic: Background Tile Editors?  (Read 1505 times)

Chicken Knife

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Background Tile Editors?
« on: December 18, 2018, 08:12:51 am »
I feel like giving editing NES background tile grids a try. I might be wrong but there must be software out there that can pull the background tile grids from the rom and allow me to edit and reinsert them. Am I dreaming or is this a real thing?

Psyklax

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Re: Background Tile Editors?
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2018, 08:26:42 am »
Tile Molester. NES graphics are usually not compressed but be prepared for economical use of the tiles.

nesrocks

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Re: Background Tile Editors?
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2018, 08:40:57 am »

Chicken Knife

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Re: Background Tile Editors?
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2018, 04:34:30 pm »
@Psyklax,

I gave tile molester a try. It is very similar to the Tile Layer Pro and YYCHR software I've been using. Perhaps this is more powerful but it doesn't help me necessarily change the "arrangement" of tiles in the background which I am looking to do.

@nesrocks

I read through the thread you linked to and the CADeditor is very interesting. It doesn't appear to yet be compatible with the Dragon Warrior II rom I've looking to work with at this moment and I did try to access that only to be welcomed by blank screens and error messages. In any case, it's cool to see something like this in production. It seems to be exactly the kind of thing I'm looking for.

nesrocks

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Re: Background Tile Editors?
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2018, 05:43:31 pm »
There is also maped pro, but it may not be suitable for dragon warrior. It needs to be tested and the format must be reverse engineered, in case it hasn't been already. http://forums.nesdev.com/viewtopic.php?t=7111

Psyklax

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Re: Background Tile Editors?
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2018, 06:10:29 pm »
change the "arrangement" of tiles in the background

Ah, well that's a different kettle of fish. :)

The arrangement of tiles - otherwise known as the nametable on the NES (with similar concepts on other systems) - is in VRAM, and is modified using game code. Every game will do it differently: some may just have a big area of the ROM dedicated to mapping out every tile, but others may try to compress it by having an instruction fill a whole area with the same/similar tiles.

What I'm trying to say is that there's no one-size-fits-all editor like this. Only game-specific editors will exist, because someone has to reverse engineer the system a particular game uses, and make a program to fit that. You wanna do it to any game? Better start learning assembly. ;)

Jorpho

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Re: Background Tile Editors?
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2018, 07:43:22 pm »
Isn't this pretty much like editing a title screen?  Such that you'd have to use the method outlined in https://www.romhacking.net/documents/33/ , replacing the tiles one-by-one and then doing a relative search?
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nesrocks

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Re: Background Tile Editors?
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2018, 08:39:45 pm »
Not really, because the format the nametable is stored in PPU's memory is standard, but the way the game stores the instructions to populate the PPU nametable memory area is usually "compressed" in some way. For example, in zelda it has a library or vertical strips of tiles, and each screen is just a series of references to which strips to use. Some games use metatiles, which is a library of 2x2 tiles, and then the levels are sequences of these metatiles. Then when the player reaches the area, the game's own code will look in the metatiles data to know which tiles to use to fill the nametable.