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Author Topic: Kiwi Kraze Editor  (Read 4516 times)

RhysOwens101

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Kiwi Kraze Editor
« on: June 30, 2015, 10:18:29 am »
Im working on a hack for the NES game Kiwi Kraze (New Zealand Story elsewhere).
I have edited some graphics but not the levels, text and etc.
I would like an editor which can be used easily to edit the levels, text and enemy behavior (Maybe).
Editing the levels should have these functions:
  • Draw-on tiles
  • Drag and Drop enemy spawners.
  • Changeable position of player, checkpoints,exits and even warp zones.
  • Changeable position where you fight the boss.
Changing the enemy behavior should have these functions:
  • Change the speed of the enemy
  • Change the enemy's projectiles
  • Choose the enemy's vehicle

If you could make an editor like this, I would really appreciate that.


RhysOwens101

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2015, 04:43:25 pm »
In your craze for kiwis, you might want to read this!
The Newbie Package of REQUIRED Material

ROMHacking.net FAQ: You ask, we answer!
ROMHacking.net Getting Started Section: Newbies Go HERE!
ROMHacking.net Documents Section!
How to ask questions the smart way.
On the Essence of ROM Hacking
Talk with experienced people in our IRC chat and ask specific questions there.

I don't really have a craze for kiwis, but I don't wanna
make an editor myself. The only thing I can really edit
in hacks without an editor is the graphics and text (through hex editors (doesn't really count)).

Seihen

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2015, 06:03:25 pm »
I don't really have a craze for kiwis, but I don't wanna
make an editor myself. The only thing I can really edit
in hacks without an editor is the graphics and text (through hex editors (doesn't really count)).

I'd like for someone to drive me to and from work, to do my job for me, and let me just do all the fun stuff.
And yet, I don't post on message boards about this...

Chpexo

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« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2015, 06:42:00 pm »
.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2016, 08:16:19 am by Chpexo »

Quick Curly

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2015, 02:13:16 pm »
This seems like a pretty cute game. :)
When trying to make changes to a game that isn't that well documented, and especially if there aren't specific utilities designed for modifying aspects of a game, it can feel overwhelming trying to figure things out for oneself. However, that's pretty much how ROM hacking for any given game begins. You can make history for all those who enjoy kiwis! ;)

First off, I normally just try to use Google to see if I can find any little bits of information here and there on the game, as there might be some dark corner of the Internet where there's someone else who enjoys a game that isn't so commonly hacked just as much as you do, and any amount of documented data can help one get started.
There does happen to be a page on The Cutting Room Floor for this game, though there isn't much, but the information about changing 0x20000 to FF in the ROM is already more than we knew from the start!

So, after some more searching around, I couldn't find anything else when it comes to RAM addresses, ROM offsets, or anything else documented related to hacking the game. This is when we have to open up a copy of the game's ROM file in a special emulator like FCEUX/FCEUXD and, by accepting that there will be a whole lot of trial and error, if one is dedicated and patient enough, regardless of how much time it may take, anything is possible, and you can potentially find everything that you're looking for.

Being familiar with the game-play definitely helps with having an idea of variables and functions that you could be looking for. Being unfamiliar with this game, upon a first glance, I didn't really find much within the first few minutes. However, if I was to continue looking and testing out different bytes and seeing what changes, the solutions to any mysteries would most likely soon reveal themselves.

Here's a possible method of how you can get started. With FCEUXD, I started to run the Code/Data Logger from the title screen, and then pressed Start so that the game would load the first level. Once the level was loaded, I paused the emulator from the FCEUXD window with the F2 key, and then I stopped the Code/Data Logger. Next, by clicking in the hex editor, bytes now appear in blue for data, yellow for code, and green if both. (As an example, 0x1A010, which is A5, and also the beginning of a ROM bank, is actually highlighted in green.)

As a random test, I decided to use the Name Table Viewer to see if I could start out with how the game handles and determines which graphical tiles to draw to the first screen. I initially focused on the top of the large building with the cage (or whatever you want to call it - hopefully you know what I'm referring to). I saw that the tile for the line at the very top was 56. So, by searching through in the hex editor, I eventually found a highlighted 56 near the bottom of the PRG-ROM, at 0x1AFD8, that when changed to, for instance, 57, changed the tile drawn for that block at the top of the building. With the way that the bytes are highlighted in this area, it's safe to consider this area where the TSA data for the blocks is located.

Upon examination of the block at the very top-left of the screen, the 56 at PPU Address $21A4 is actually the bottom part of that block on the top of the building. So, that one block is made up like this:

Top-left corner: PPU Address $2184: Tile #$26
Top-right corner: PPU Address $2185: Tile #$26
Bottom-left corner: PPU Address $21A4: Tile #$56
Bottom-right corner: PPU Address $21A5: Tile #$56

Observing the groups of highlighted bytes, we can see that the following ROM offsets make up that one block (especially if you try changing the values and then reloading the level to see how the tiles that are displayed change, and how the block is visually affected):

0x1AED8: 26 - Top-left corner
0x1AF58: 26 - Top-right corner
0x1AFD8: 56 - Bottom-left corner
0x1B058: 56 - Bottom-right corner

So, the value of each corner of a tile is within one of four groups of 0x80 (in hex), or 128 bytes. However, the question is determining where the exact beginning of each group is, just to know for sure. This would be important information to know for determining how the object data for the level system works.

0x1AEB7 is 03, which seems to be the top-left corner of the ground blocks drawn to the screen. I guessed that, while in RAM, this would be RAM address $AEA7 (although, it could have been $CEA7 depending on how the game swaps ROM banks, which is why trial and error must be accepted, even with basic knowledge of how the NES works in general), and so I set a read breakpoint in the Debugger. Sure enough, I got a hit while the game was still running in the level.

Code: [Select]
$FA85 (0x1FA95 in ROM)

$FA85:B1 6E     LDA ($6E),Y @ $AEA7 = #$03
$FA87:60        RTS
So, it appears that at least one address for loading TSA data, at least for that one block, is stored at $6E in the zero page in RAM.
At $006E and $006F respectively, there is A5 and AE, or $AEA5 in reverse.

There are also these bits of code visible nearby in the Debugger window:

Code: [Select]
$FA88:B1 72     LDA ($72),Y @ $AFA7 = #$04
$FA8A:60        RTS

$FA91:B1 70     LDA ($70),Y @ $AF27 = #$03
$FA93:60        RTS

$FA94:B1 74     LDA ($74),Y @ $B027 = #$04
$FA96:60        RTS

Remember that Y is 02 with the game currently frozen, and the beginnings are actually 2 bytes before the addresses displayed, as found from the $6E, $70, $72, and $74 addresses stored in the zero page.
$AEA5 is 0x1AEB5 in the ROM.
$AF25 is 0x1AF35 in the ROM.
$AFA5 is 0x1AFB5 in the ROM.
$B025 is 0x1B035 in the ROM.

So, my conclusion at this point is that these are the ranges for the objects' TSA, at least for that section of it.
0x1AEB5 - 0x1AF34 (0x80) - Top-left corner tiles
0x1AF35 - 0x1AFB4 (0x80) - Top-right corner tiles
0x1AFB5 - 0x1B034 (0x80) - Bottom-left corner tiles
0x1B035 - 0x1B0B4 (0x80) - Bottom-right corner tiles

I'm questioning where the other 0x80 (in hex), or 128 bytes come in, while considering how SMB3 works with common objects shared between the multiple Object Sets, and each Object Set having its own respective half of TSA as well; however, as far as I know, this is probably the wrong assumption to have, as again, I'm truly not familiar with this game, and haven't bothered to do deeper digging to further analyze what exactly is going on in every single dark corner of the ROM. This post, again, was only meant to serve as a starting point for your hacking conquest, if you still so choose. I attempt to be a helpful and encouraging person, but even I understand as a hacker myself that when we choose to do a project, we have to commit to the majority of the work.

0x1B0B5 - 0x1B134 (0x80) appears to be the palette definitions for the tiles; which quarter of the 16-byte object palette that the tile uses (00, 01, 02, or 03).

I will stop here for now. Hopefully this will help you get started with finding even more out for hacking the levels and whatnot! Best of luck! :beer:

tryphon

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2015, 02:33:30 pm »
If there was a reputation system on this board, this post would deserve a lot of it :)

Just a note : The Sega Master System of New Zealand Story (or even the Genesis one) is so much better. It would be a better base for a hack.

Maeson

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2015, 04:08:18 pm »
While is true that the Master System version has some advantages, the NES version has it's own strong points against the MS version.

Some aspects of the gameplay are better on NES, it is more faithful to the original, and it has pretty much all the warp points and enemies, and it's more generous with continues and lives. Master System misses quite a number of warps, some areas have enemies removed for some reason, and it gives you 3 lives and that's it, good luck.

And the music on the NES is awesome, and beats the Master System soundtrack, although music is always subjective...

That said, the MS version plays faster, if I remember correctly, and it had much nicer visuals, and overall presentation, being closer to the original and the levels aren't as downscaled as the NES, which also has less colors to work with and less detail (although pretty good for what it is).

Both are by far the best versions out of all the ones made by that time...

It's one of those old multiplatform games where I really can't choose one version over another.
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RhysOwens101

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2015, 05:23:03 pm »
This seems like a pretty cute game. :)
When trying to make changes to a game that isn't that well documented, and especially if there aren't specific utilities designed for modifying aspects of a game, it can feel overwhelming trying to figure things out for oneself. However, that's pretty much how ROM hacking for any given game begins. You can make history for all those who enjoy kiwis! ;)

First off, I normally just try to use Google to see if I can find any little bits of information here and there on the game, as there might be some dark corner of the Internet where there's someone else who enjoys a game that isn't so commonly hacked just as much as you do, and any amount of documented data can help one get started.
There does happen to be a page on The Cutting Room Floor for this game, though there isn't much, but the information about changing 0x20000 to FF in the ROM is already more than we knew from the start!

So, after some more searching around, I couldn't find anything else when it comes to RAM addresses, ROM offsets, or anything else documented related to hacking the game. This is when we have to open up a copy of the game's ROM file in a special emulator like FCEUX/FCEUXD and, by accepting that there will be a whole lot of trial and error, if one is dedicated and patient enough, regardless of how much time it may take, anything is possible, and you can potentially find everything that you're looking for.

Being familiar with the game-play definitely helps with having an idea of variables and functions that you could be looking for. Being unfamiliar with this game, upon a first glance, I didn't really find much within the first few minutes. However, if I was to continue looking and testing out different bytes and seeing what changes, the solutions to any mysteries would most likely soon reveal themselves.

Here's a possible method of how you can get started. With FCEUXD, I started to run the Code/Data Logger from the title screen, and then pressed Start so that the game would load the first level. Once the level was loaded, I paused the emulator from the FCEUXD window with the F2 key, and then I stopped the Code/Data Logger. Next, by clicking in the hex editor, bytes now appear in blue for data, yellow for code, and green if both. (As an example, 0x1A010, which is A5, and also the beginning of a ROM bank, is actually highlighted in green.)

As a random test, I decided to use the Name Table Viewer to see if I could start out with how the game handles and determines which graphical tiles to draw to the first screen. I initially focused on the top of the large building with the cage (or whatever you want to call it - hopefully you know what I'm referring to). I saw that the tile for the line at the very top was 56. So, by searching through in the hex editor, I eventually found a highlighted 56 near the bottom of the PRG-ROM, at 0x1AFD8, that when changed to, for instance, 57, changed the tile drawn for that block at the top of the building. With the way that the bytes are highlighted in this area, it's safe to consider this area where the TSA data for the blocks is located.

Upon examination of the block at the very top-left of the screen, the 56 at PPU Address $21A4 is actually the bottom part of that block on the top of the building. So, that one block is made up like this:

Top-left corner: PPU Address $2184: Tile #$26
Top-right corner: PPU Address $2185: Tile #$26
Bottom-left corner: PPU Address $21A4: Tile #$56
Bottom-right corner: PPU Address $21A5: Tile #$56

Observing the groups of highlighted bytes, we can see that the following ROM offsets make up that one block (especially if you try changing the values and then reloading the level to see how the tiles that are displayed change, and how the block is visually affected):

0x1AED8: 26 - Top-left corner
0x1AF58: 26 - Top-right corner
0x1AFD8: 56 - Bottom-left corner
0x1B058: 56 - Bottom-right corner

So, the value of each corner of a tile is within one of four groups of 0x80 (in hex), or 128 bytes. However, the question is determining where the exact beginning of each group is, just to know for sure. This would be important information to know for determining how the object data for the level system works.

0x1AEB7 is 03, which seems to be the top-left corner of the ground blocks drawn to the screen. I guessed that, while in RAM, this would be RAM address $AEA7 (although, it could have been $CEA7 depending on how the game swaps ROM banks, which is why trial and error must be accepted, even with basic knowledge of how the NES works in general), and so I set a read breakpoint in the Debugger. Sure enough, I got a hit while the game was still running in the level.

Code: [Select]
$FA85 (0x1FA95 in ROM)

$FA85:B1 6E     LDA ($6E),Y @ $AEA7 = #$03
$FA87:60        RTS
So, it appears that at least one address for loading TSA data, at least for that one block, is stored at $6E in the zero page in RAM.
At $006E and $006F respectively, there is A5 and AE, or $AEA5 in reverse.

There are also these bits of code visible nearby in the Debugger window:

Code: [Select]
$FA88:B1 72     LDA ($72),Y @ $AFA7 = #$04
$FA8A:60        RTS

$FA91:B1 70     LDA ($70),Y @ $AF27 = #$03
$FA93:60        RTS

$FA94:B1 74     LDA ($74),Y @ $B027 = #$04
$FA96:60        RTS

Remember that Y is 02 with the game currently frozen, and the beginnings are actually 2 bytes before the addresses displayed, as found from the $6E, $70, $72, and $74 addresses stored in the zero page.
$AEA5 is 0x1AEB5 in the ROM.
$AF25 is 0x1AF35 in the ROM.
$AFA5 is 0x1AFB5 in the ROM.
$B025 is 0x1B035 in the ROM.

So, my conclusion at this point is that these are the ranges for the objects' TSA, at least for that section of it.
0x1AEB5 - 0x1AF34 (0x80) - Top-left corner tiles
0x1AF35 - 0x1AFB4 (0x80) - Top-right corner tiles
0x1AFB5 - 0x1B034 (0x80) - Bottom-left corner tiles
0x1B035 - 0x1B0B4 (0x80) - Bottom-right corner tiles

I'm questioning where the other 0x80 (in hex), or 128 bytes come in, while considering how SMB3 works with common objects shared between the multiple Object Sets, and each Object Set having its own respective half of TSA as well; however, as far as I know, this is probably the wrong assumption to have, as again, I'm truly not familiar with this game, and haven't bothered to do deeper digging to further analyze what exactly is going on in every single dark corner of the ROM. This post, again, was only meant to serve as a starting point for your hacking conquest, if you still so choose. I attempt to be a helpful and encouraging person, but even I understand as a hacker myself that when we choose to do a project, we have to commit to the majority of the work.

0x1B0B5 - 0x1B134 (0x80) appears to be the palette definitions for the tiles; which quarter of the 16-byte object palette that the tile uses (00, 01, 02, or 03).

I will stop here for now. Hopefully this will help you get started with finding even more out for hacking the levels and whatnot! Best of luck! :beer:

Do you have to throw all that information at me? All that I can't handle reading. If I change those tiles like you said, It only changes how it looks, it doesn't make it a solid.
I would recommend giving that information to a some other amateur/professional hacker so he can take it in unlike me.

Also, as said in the above posts. I don't wanna swap to the Master System version because I can't edit it's graphics in YY-CHR, I can't see where even the player's sprite is in he CHR.

Quick Curly

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2015, 05:56:48 pm »
Do you have to throw all that information at me? All that I can't handle reading. If I change those tiles like you said, It only changes how it looks, it doesn't make it a solid.
I would recommend giving that information to a some other amateur/professional hacker so he can take it in unlike me.

Also, as said in the above posts. I don't wanna swap to the Master System version because I can't edit it's graphics in YY-CHR, I can't see where even the player's sprite is in he CHR.
Wow. I didn't expect such a response, but I guess based on how you appeared out of nowhere demanding someone make an editor of a game with no data already documented just for you, I should have. At the very least, you could have thanked me when you take into consideration the previous posts not exactly giving you anything more specific to start from than the FAQ newbie package.

My post, as I said, was intended to give you a starting ground and approach of sorts towards the mentality you need when wanting to make in-depth changes to a game, and when you're dealing with aspects like the level format when you don't have an editor to help you. Unlike what you're asking, I'm not going to do all the work for you. If I didn't post, it's unlikely that anyone else would have bothered to even look anything up for you, because generally, people won't bother. I try to do things differently, but when people like you prove the main perception right, you're not really giving me much motivation to continue trying.

Yes, the solidity for the tiles isn't affected. "TSA", as it's been coined throughout the years, simply refers to the graphics used to draw the objects to the screen. Solidity is different. I didn't look that up. My post provided a detailed tutorial that you could follow to help ease you in to the process, both physical and mental, to be able to achieve much more than you expected that you could or intended to do. Once you find something like how the tiles are drawn, that can lead into finding how the level data works, allowing you to add, delete, and/or move objects around to make your own designs.

But, you know what? Everyone else had the right outlook when it comes to newbies who come on a forum just to request something and then never be heard from again. If that's seriously your immediate response and you feel that you can't even read a tutorial trying to help you, what makes you think that you should even be doing a ROM hacking project of any sort? You need a more positive outlook and be more willing to actually make an effort if you expect to get anywhere. Lessons to learn and live by.

Anyway, have a nice life.

If there was a reputation system on this board, this post would deserve a lot of it :)

Just a note : The Sega Master System of New Zealand Story (or even the Genesis one) is so much better. It would be a better base for a hack.
This post, however, before RhysOwens101 posted their reply, really put a big smile on my face that I couldn't shake off, and just so that you know, tryphon, I really appreciate your kind words. :angel: People like you are why I do my best to give back to the community when I can, because I take into consideration how I started out with no knowledge whatsoever, and acknowledge that it can be difficult. However, when one truly wants something, they just need to believe, as well as make the necessary effort without expecting things to just fall into their lap, and then, anything truly is possible. :) If I can help provide a little insight and direction, I feel like I'm giving back.

Okay... Maybe it is a lot to take in right from the bat, but the thing is, RhysOwens101, you have to be willing to try. You have to accept trial and error. From what I and the other members so far have been able to gather from your short presence, you want it to be easier than it might be from the very start. If you've really managed to edit the text without it already being documented, meaning that you had to go and find it yourself, and use a hex editor to do so no less, why did you immediately give up and say that it was too much? And why am I even still bothering? Who knows? Life is full of mysteries. The question is, will they remain unsolved? Let us find out next time on Forum Drama: The Series.


EDIT: Okay. I don't know why I bothered to open this game up in FCEUXD again, but I did some more trial and error.
Based on how the one block at the top-left of the screen had the TSA loaded 2 bytes in, I saw at the very start of the ROM a whole bunch of "02"s, at 0x00010. Changing those to "03" changed the blocks at the top.
Again, I ran the Code/Data Logger before loading the level, so there were bytes highlighted in blue for data. I scrolled down to the last highlighted line that started with a "04", which appeared to me to be the kind of block that is at the very left in the open sky rows. My intention was to find one of the bottom rows where I could change bytes and see if the objects that would be affected were changed to blocks, solidity and all.
I changed 0x0025A-0x0025D (0x4) all to 04. Originally, they were all 01. When the level was reloaded, there were blocks drawn there, solidity and all.
So, the level data seems to be at the beginning of the ROM. Experiment, accept trial and error, accept that you most likely won't get a level editor unless someone else who's overly giving and interested in such a project on their own accord comes around, and maybe you'll be able to do what you hope.

I do apologize for my own outburst, since against my better nature, I do my best to be an understanding and forgiving person. However, please don't expect anymore help from me.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2015, 06:38:21 pm by Quick Curly »

Jorpho

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2015, 10:14:36 pm »
Wasn't there something like Atlas or Cartographer that made it relatively easy to edit maps once you decoded the level format?

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Maeson

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2015, 04:09:35 am »
I do apologize for my own outburst, since against my better nature, I do my best to be an understanding and forgiving person. However, please don't expect anymore help from me.

I don't think there is need for an apology. Not from you at least

Although I find pretty funny how someone can ask for something, get info, and then say "Hey tell that to someone interested".

I mean, wow. I don't like how much hate for new people there is here (Being pretty noob myself), but sometimes is totally understandable...
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RhysOwens101

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2015, 05:22:16 am »
Okay. I don't know why I bothered to open this game up in FCEUXD again, but I did some more trial and error.
Based on how the one block at the top-left of the screen had the TSA loaded 2 bytes in, I saw at the very start of the ROM a whole bunch of "02"s, at 0x00010. Changing those to "03" changed the blocks at the top.
Again, I ran the Code/Data Logger before loading the level, so there were bytes highlighted in blue for data. I scrolled down to the last highlighted line that started with a "04", which appeared to me to be the kind of block that is at the very left in the open sky rows. My intention was to find one of the bottom rows where I could change bytes and see if the objects that would be affected were changed to blocks, solidity and all.
I changed 0x0025A-0x0025D (0x4) all to 04. Originally, they were all 01. When the level was reloaded, there were blocks drawn there, solidity and all.
So, the level data seems to be at the beginning of the ROM. Experiment, accept trial and error, accept that you most likely won't get a level editor unless someone else who's overly giving and interested in such a project on their own accord comes around, and maybe you'll be able to do what you hope.

K, I've done something to 1-1. I changed up the tiles at the end of the level a bit.
Screenshot below.



You'd expect someone to use that information to make an editor with it.
Why not make a document of this or something.

dougeff

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2015, 04:45:55 pm »
Quick Curly, that really was a great reply. Some of us appreciate the effort.

RO101- I spent the last hour trying to think of a clever insult. Instead, I'll just say -really- read the link "how to ask questions the smart way". I know it's long, but read it. Really. Print it out. Highlight it. And, then read Quick Curly's post again, which is a good read.
nesdoug.com -- blog/tutorial on programming for the NES

RhysOwens101

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2015, 11:29:43 am »
Quick Curly, that really was a great reply. Some of us appreciate the effort.

RO101- I spent the last hour trying to think of a clever insult. Instead, I'll just say -really- read the link "how to ask questions the smart way". I know it's long, but read it. Really. Print it out. Highlight it. And, then read Quick Curly's post again, which is a good read.

I thought I was being nice, come on.

dougeff

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2015, 04:07:48 pm »
Maybe I misunderstood you. Sorry. I think most of the problems in life are based on false expectations. For example, I know that looking at Quick Curly's response, makes it look like it's really easy. It's not easy. Game hacking is slow and requires a lot of patience and hard work. Some people spend months, even years, on 1 project.
Take that, and double it, would be how long it would take to make a game-specific level editor for an obscure game with no documentation.
 And I have my own false expectations... For example, I expected this conversation to go something like this...

RO101-hey I need some help hacking Kiwi Kraze, here's what I want to do.

QC-here's a 20 paragraph explanation that will get you started

RO101-oh wow! thank you so much! Unfortunately, I don't understand all of that. How do I edit the level data to do solidity?

Qc-another detailed explanation.

RO101-Oh, great, your the best. Thank you so much!

Qc-no problem. Good luck.

(And 2-6 months later, after lots of hard work, you submit your game)
« Last Edit: July 12, 2015, 05:15:14 pm by dougeff »
nesdoug.com -- blog/tutorial on programming for the NES

RhysOwens101

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2015, 04:15:13 pm »
Ok, I have changed up some the first 2 levels ever so slightly now.
I call the hack Agent Jones, in the hack you control secret agent Jones out to defeat the evil robot wizard Zaro, long story short.
Here's a few more screenshots of my progress.





July 18, 2015, 10:15:26 am - (Auto Merged - Double Posts are not allowed before 7 days.)
Maybe I misunderstood you. Sorry. I think most of the problems in life are based on false expectations. For example, I know that looking at Quick Curly's response, makes it look like it's really easy. It's not easy. Game hacking is slow and requires a lot of patience and hard work. Some people spend months, even years, on 1 project.
Take that, and double it, would be how long it would take to make a game-specific level editor for an obscure game with no documentation.
 And I have my own false expectations... For example, I expected this conversation to go something like this...

RO101-hey I need some help hacking Kiwi Kraze, here's what I want to do.

QC-here's a 20 paragraph explanation that will get you started

RO101-oh wow! thank you so much! Unfortunately, I don't understand all of that. How do I edit the level data to do solidity?

Qc-another detailed explanation.

RO101-Oh, great, your the best. Thank you so much!

Qc-no problem. Good luck.

(And 2-6 months later, after lots of hard work, you submit your game)

Also, I like being informative. I don't like saying simple things like that.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2015, 10:15:27 am by RhysOwens101 »

RhysOwens101

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Re: Kiwi Kraze Editor
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2015, 04:17:34 pm »
Got a couple more edits in.  ;)