News: 11 March 2016 - Forum Rules
Current Moderators - DarkSol, KingMike, MathOnNapkins, Azkadellia, Danke

Author Topic: Gaming preferences?  (Read 5579 times)

InfamousKnight

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 321
    • View Profile
Gaming preferences?
« on: October 26, 2013, 02:35:37 pm »
What are your gaming preferences?
Mine are:
1: Good character design(that is like a must in my world)
2: Turn-Based Battle system(so I can compete with it easier and I'm not really good at action games)
3: Fitting music(as in it fits whats going on)
4: Good game design so that you don't get lost
5: Non-linear gameplay(as in getting clues from villagers on what to do)

So yeah, thats pretty much it. I don't really care about "realistic" graphics or 3D graphics. I also like a long journey in the game.

Here's what I don't like:
1: Mini games that slow me down
2: Puzzles(any puzzle really)
3: Searching for an item just to advance through the plot
4: Graphics that are so bad, it doesn't even have art to it.
5: Cryptic game controls(most commonly when you press select to do something you have to do as seen in some of the AVGN episodes)

Things that I don't really care about as in it doesn't bother me:
1: When they rip ideas on from other games
2: A story line
3: Weird shit that happens(I honestly don't even notice)
4: When the game is too easy
5: Minor flaws(such as bugs that break the game as in making it even more easy)

So yeah, thats the format I want you guys to use. Just five things or less.

On a side note: Has anyone already done this recently? I haven't found anything yet. I just skimmed through the topics.

FallenAngel2387

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 705
    • View Profile
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2013, 03:04:20 pm »
4: Graphics that are so bad, it doesn't even have art to it.

Can you elaborate on that?

Quote
5: Cryptic game controls(most commonly when you press select to do something you have to do as seen in some of the AVGN episodes)

It's usually in the games manual, and if you don't have access to a manual, guides at GameFAQs can help you figure out controls.

My only preference would be fun/enjoyment. If I did have a list, it would probably differ quite a bit from yours. I feel like I'm getting into adventure games and RPG's less and less over time.

FAST6191

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2622
    • View Profile
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2013, 05:05:30 pm »
4 and 5 from the first list might well conflict with each other.

I am also quite curious about 4 on the second list.

Fitting music. A potentially long debate there, I am not sure I have ever encountered music that I would consider unfitting rather than just bad.

By puzzles I assume you mean overt puzzles as "getting clues from villagers on what to do" would probably be coded in a remarkably similar way to a conventional puzzle.

On minigames. Does this mean you can stand some and it is more those that are awkwardly crowbarred into a game that cause you trouble?

Preferences. Traditional* gameplay styles have been pushed far enough that I am struggling to see the differences these days and can not see where there really is to go from here give or take a bit more lighting effects and maybe someone will get properly into deformation. To that end the really interesting things, much like science and arts in general, come from smashing two traditionally separate things together and seeing what results.

*I have some reservation about using the term as many older games do not exactly belong a given gameplay style beyond pointlessly broad things like "arcade" or "puzzle".

Bregalad

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2650
    • View Profile
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2013, 05:54:18 pm »
I am not sure I have ever encountered music that I would consider unfitting rather than just bad.
Unfitting music can really make you think "WTF ?!?". I could cite a few exemples I have experienced :
- When you go to the moon on FF8 a festive waltz plays but you're going in space and in danger of death
- During the last fight in Star Ocean a 1284753901945th remix of the main theme plays, very calm song that doesn't sound like a battle song at all, let alone a final battle song.
- The music in the last dungeon of FF10, which is just a series of dissonant strings chords, feels like an horror music instead of a last dungeon music

I don't have so many examples but I think this is enough to proof you my concept of unfitting music.

Quote
I feel like I'm getting into adventure games and RPG's less and less over time.
I feel like I'm getting in games less and less over time. I hardly play a game once a month anymore.

InfamousKnight

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 321
    • View Profile
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2013, 06:04:58 pm »
@FallenAngel I mean when its so "pixelated" that theres really not a lot you can do other than make things really big to actually make anything with. For example: On the atari 2600, most of the time it was just small sprites because they didn't have a lot of options other than to make it really big to make anything interesting.

@Fast What I mean by "puzzles" I mean like block, make all lights turn the same, stuff like that. I also wasn't aware that getting clues from villages was considered a puzzle. And about the mini games, I mean like sneaking section(oh boy do I hate that), games that take time and focus to do(like that time in FF7 where you have to press all the buttons at once). Seriously, someone that played that game 50 times still can't pull it off on their first attempt. And like that rope mini game where you need the right time to get on it.

Some of those factors keep my hands off FF7. Theres just things in that game I don't like. Its a good game after all.

FallenAngel2387

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 705
    • View Profile
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2013, 06:47:20 pm »
Are there any other examples aside from the industries beginnings? :P Of course that's going to look "bad" by comparison.

I feel like I'm getting in games less and less over time. I hardly play a game once a month anymore.

I'm probably getting there too, but you'll get the urge when it's been long enough.

Talbain

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3183
  • Moo.
    • View Profile
    • et tu gamer
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2013, 08:53:04 pm »
Chrono Trigger / Dark Souls / Ogre Battle March of the Black Queen / Cho Ren Sha 68K

Basically games that are like these games are probably my favorite styles thus far.

Arcanum of Steamworks and Magick Obscura is another style I want to get into more, but the problem is that even Arcanum (which I currently consider the pinnacle of the style) doesn't implement its own mechanics well.

Skullgirls
is my competitive game of choice.

FAST6191

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2622
    • View Profile
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2013, 08:56:45 pm »
Add another into the "not really playing games" group. I had a bit of a regression when I got a few interesting games and some humble bundles these last few months, however I am not really inclined to ignore either the tech, the business or the less than well considered academic side of games at this point.

On the unfitting music bit. I have not played some of the things mentioned and seen as I am not exactly music trained I probably lack the "language of music" bit to call properly fitting or not. Similarly I am also a fan of having music that runs quite contrary to the matter at hand (to put it very crudely and oversimplify loads then something along the lines of slow bpm in fast action works well enough for me).
Still I went and looked up your examples... I can possibly see the FF10 thing but the other two did not seem so bad though I would have preferred the star ocean one to not be quite so drowned out.

Rhys

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 706
    • View Profile
    • CN
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2013, 09:30:07 pm »
The story is paramount above anything else for me, that's why I tend to prefer games like Heavy Rain, or cutscene heavy games like MGS4.

Next Gen Cowboy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1766
  • "People are like dice"
    • View Profile
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2013, 09:35:57 pm »


Arcanum of Steamworks and Magick Obscura is another style I want to get into more, but the problem is that even Arcanum (which I currently consider the pinnacle of the style) doesn't implement its own mechanics well.



You'd go there instead of something like BGII, or Neverwinter Nights, or even Planescape: Torment? Is it just not liking the overdone fantasy setting, or do you actually prefer Arcanum? I think Arcanum is a great game, but there's a lot wrong with it, and I'd say the same thing about Fallout 2.

I happen to enjoy well-implemented mini games (Yakuza) and I don't mind puzzles if they're more interesting push a block here, or insert the only object you can interact with into this conspicuous hollow. I prefer action rpgs to turned based battle systems (although I'm not opposed to turn based systems) although I really like smooth, quick turn based gameplay (FFX).

Graphically I'm O.K. with anything past the early-NES era, although I'm admittedly more of a graphics-whore than most people on here.

I don't understand your cryptic game controls comment. Although what's cryptic to some people isn't to others. I like complex control schemes in games, especially when they offer some advantage (fighting games/Devil May Cry) where a basic move set can see you to victory, but you're rewarded for longer strings of button presses, and more precise combos.

As for the story aspect. That's one reason I enjoy RPGs, and a game stealing ideas from something else doesn't bother me too much, as long as it's not blatant, and well-implemented (two very big IFs). There are very original ideas in some games, and there are many games that I enjoy that don't do anything original, but instead polish basic concepts.

As for ease in games. It depends on what I'm playing. Certain games, and game companies put out games that I expect to be difficult, and that's one of the reasons that I play games by these companies. But sometimes I just want to kick back and play something simple, and there's more than enough of that out there.

Generally speaking I turn difficulty up on games, because I enjoy a challenge, but there's a lot of genres that I'm not very good at: puzzle games, platformers, side-scrolling shooters, and shoot-em-ups have always given my trouble (with some exceptions).
"Remember when we were in Japan? You said you were my gun, if you're the gun then that means I'm the bullet."

"All my life I've been waiting for the gunpowder to go off, you know what you need to ignite gunpowder? You need a gun."

Talbain

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3183
  • Moo.
    • View Profile
    • et tu gamer
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2013, 10:42:25 pm »
You'd go there instead of something like BGII, or Neverwinter Nights, or even Planescape: Torment? Is it just not liking the overdone fantasy setting, or do you actually prefer Arcanum? I think Arcanum is a great game, but there's a lot wrong with it, and I'd say the same thing about Fallout 2.
Sure, there's a lot wrong with it, but it's my opinion that there is just as much, if not more wrong with all the other games you've mentioned.  My primary reason for picking Arcanum is because of how its systems mechanics implement themselves into the game world, and none of the other games aren't relying on preconceived story/mechanical notions of a game.

To me, Arcanum is convinced of its game world, and all the other isometric RPGs I've played are clearly not and thus spend their time uncomfortably between their universe and the universe they're drawing inspiration from.  The split between Arcanum and these other isometric games comes, I think, when you consider the design itself, and as a player that likes the "solo" experience if it's one given to me (playing with one character rather than a party of characters), I feel that Arcanum offers a richer experience in such an instance.  Arcanum is an extraordinarily rich world, and part of the reason it's such a cult classic is because the people who made it clearly immersed themselves in the world they created. 

I would say the Planescape game also illustrates a similar loving connection to a world, but it's a world that is derivative by definition.  It would feel unnatural, to me, to see Tolkien writing a story inside a D&D universe, and I think that's my primary objection to most of the other games that came out of isometric RPGs.  I find myself constantly wondering how much of any given universe is unique if it's already based on an existing universe.  The result is that I see these universes in universes as always being a reflection of a reflection, making it difficult to see genuine inspiration as it's mirrored through many minds.  I think it's also why games with huge teams also frequently seem so soulless.

ChronoMoogle

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 358
  • Super Famicom all the way.
    • View Profile
    • SNESfreaks
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #11 on: October 27, 2013, 12:44:51 pm »
Things which I love:
1: good learning curve (easy to learn, hard to master)
2: puzzles and/or tactic (which fusion well with the basic gameplay)
3: semi-non linear gameplay (you've got a clear goal and mostly fixed storyline but exploring/backtracking and sidequesting rewards you)
4: good athmosphere with fitting presentation
5: some kind of highscore system for competition which does't allow milking at any point (for arcade-style games)
6: good level design with love for detail

Things which put me off: the opposites of those 6 points.

JirinPanthosa

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 19
    • View Profile
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #12 on: October 27, 2013, 02:27:53 pm »
My favorite games tend to be action, adventure or RPGs.

My preferences really depend on the sort of game I'm playing.

For action games I like quick movement with simple controls rather than complicated combo systems.  That way the complexity of gameplay comes from clever level design instead of deciding whether to press X-Y-X or X-Y-Y to produce the exact movement you need for a particular enemy time.

Also I like a pulled back camera way more than first person perspective, because constantly worrying about getting killed from an enemy you can't see behind you is a huge annoyance.

For story I like the 'Less is more' style of storytelling.  If you've ever heard the expression 'Don't tell me, show me' applied to movies, I feel the same way about games.  I like games that show you the story through the world design and a minimal amount of dialog rather than through long indulgent cutscenes.  For example, I like Shin Megami Tensei: Nocturne's approach to story more than Final Fantasy XIII's.  And I love it in games like Super Metroid and Zelda:  LTTP how they express the story elegantly by the visual design of the areas.

For RPG combat, I don't care if it's turn based or action oriented, but what I can't stand is not being in control of your full party.  It's one thing if it's a game like Tales or Star Ocean where you have such good control over your control character that you can pretty much handle the battle yourself + healing support.  But if it's a game like Xenoblade where you don't have much physical control over your character and you also have zero control over your allies, that's just ridiculous.  Any strategic options you have in battle, the player should have full control over their behavior.

Also, hidden items.  Hiding things in cool places that can be logically figured out, like the SNES DKC games, good.  Hiding things in random places you could only ever find by checking every little random corner in the level and forcing you to get 100% of them to get to the hardest levels, like the newer Mario games, very, very bad.

Difficulty, hard enough to force you to be skilled at the game in order to win, but not so hard that it's cheap and can only be beaten through grinding, brute force repetition and/or save states.

Handholding is right out and can ruin a game for me completely.  Teach me new aspects of the game by presenting them in a context where I'm forced to use them naturally, don't set me aside in a 45 minute segment and give me hints for how to do things I should have to figure out myself.

And I love block puzzles and switch puzzles.  Lufia 2 is one of my favorite games.   ;D
« Last Edit: October 27, 2013, 02:42:10 pm by JirinPanthosa »

PresidentLeever

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 644
    • View Profile
    • Mini-Revver
Re: Gaming preferences?
« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2013, 01:58:26 pm »
Uniform and appealing aesthetics. Technical trickery is plus too if its a retro game.

Innovative mechanics with some depth to them.

Smooth pacing and (if it's action based) intense gameplay.

Fair challenge (some amount of memorization is OK though).

Intuitive design and subtle pushes in the right direction (no slow text tutorials or obvious signs showing what to do or where to go)

As short length/condensed an experience as possible ie. no repetition or dead space unless there's a narrative purpose.

Exploration - this should be mostly optional, more rewarding than finding generic items (points/1-ups) and not bog down the pacing too much. I like finding new gear or abilites to try out, or new alternate challenges.
Edit: One neat touch from recent memory is the hidden room with a few candles and a man and his dog in Castlevania IV. If you take out the dog first, the man starts crying. Unexpected stuff like that is great to see.

Some sort of unbalanced element which is optional, like a smart bomb, shield or invincibility mode. Just to throw things off a bit here and there.

My favorite games tend to be action, adventure or RPGs.

Also I like a pulled back camera way more than first person perspective, because constantly worrying about getting killed from an enemy you can't see behind you is a huge annoyance.

For story I like the 'Less is more' style of storytelling.  If you've ever heard the expression 'Don't tell me, show me' applied to movies, I feel the same way about games.  I like games that show you the story through the world design and a minimal amount of dialog rather than through long indulgent cutscenes.  For example, I like Shin Megami Tensei: Nocturne's approach to story more than Final Fantasy XIII's.  And I love it in games like Super Metroid and Zelda:  LTTP how they express the story elegantly by the visual design of the areas.

Also, hidden items.  Hiding things in cool places that can be logically figured out, like the SNES DKC games, good.  Hiding things in random places you could only ever find by checking every little random corner in the level and forcing you to get 100% of them to get to the hardest levels, like the newer Mario games, very, very bad.

Handholding is right out and can ruin a game for me completely.  Teach me new aspects of the game by presenting them in a context where I'm forced to use them naturally, don't set me aside in a 45 minute segment and give me hints for how to do things I should have to figure out myself.

And I love block puzzles and switch puzzles.  Lufia 2 is one of my favorite games.   ;D
Strongly agree with these :)

Edit 2:
Something I dislike which is kind of common in old RPGs and Adventure games is inconsistency in or plain lack of interaction with the environment. If there are interesting looking objects, let me interact with them as with everything else, if only to 'check' them to get a comment from the player. Sometimes there are puzzle situations that could've been solved with more consistent or freer interaction as well. Let me be creative and find different solutions, please.

« Last Edit: November 01, 2013, 02:33:55 pm by PresidentLeever »
Mini-reviews, retro sound chip tribute, romhacks and general listage at my site: Mini-Revver.