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How did you start programming?

Started by InfamousKnight, August 28, 2013, 08:47:50 PM

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InfamousKnight

I'm not sure if this is the right section, but if it isn't then just move it.

Anyway, some teens were telling me about programming. They were saying it was really hard. They obviously had no passion in programming whatsoever. They say that making a game is really hard. Then they said that making an RPG is really hard. I love making RPGs. That's all I do in programming.

So then, after some years have passed and I had some experience in programming, I wanted to share with them my projects. They looked at it and didn't even make any comment or make a smile at all. I really wanted to show them my battle system I made to give them some inspiration but frankly, they were not interested.

Oh, I forgot to mention what I language I started out with. To be honest, it was batch file scripting. I didn't even know it wasn't programming. Those teens that told me about programming were saying that command prompt was the first language.. Uh, command prompt isn't a scripting or programming language at all. Its a freakin windows tool.

How I started out with making RPGs is that I found this guy that made a game called Dark Kingdoms(not findable anymore) and I really loved that concept. It was made in batch since the community I was on, batch files were really popular.

Then I thought I might learn some new languages like C++. And another thing I did wrong was use youtube to learn. I did watch some of newboston videos but I didn't quite understand them. It was really because they were poorly taught. So I pretty much used youtube as my resource to learning.

The first game I made was hangman which was in batch scripting. Of course, the code sucked since there isn't any structural programming in it whatsoever. I could show you the first programming video I watched. It was c++ but I didn't understand it and I stopped watching the video. I think I might be able to show you the first video that I understood. Kinda :P 

The first forum I joined was Lingubender.com(it was shutdown due to a database crash) and I always asked questions on there and showed them simplistic projects and they were interested to answering and giving positive feedback. After that, botfactory.org was created as an alternative but then it just died and nobody was going on it anymore so I joined RHDN. I really like somewhat small forums. Those huge forums are overwhelming. This site is really good. And I'm sorry for breaking the rules in the past. I don't remember the order of the languages I learned just so you know. I am still a novice to this day and I started back in 2009. so I've been programming for about 4 years. And I still don't know the basics :P Like every element in programming.

Gideon Zhi

First thing you need to learn is how to properly format your stuff. Makes it a lot more readable.

snarfblam

I started with Applesoft BASIC. I tried Terrapin Logo but I didn't much care for the syntax or data structures. Fun fact: Applesoft BASIC was written by Microsoft (apparently Apple + Microsoft = Applesoft).

InfamousKnight

Quote from: Gideon Zhi on August 28, 2013, 08:54:17 PM
First thing you need to learn is how to properly format your stuff. Makes it a lot more readable.

Yeah, I have a lot of trouble with organizing.. I'll write paragraphs on my own time for practice. Do you mean put everything into sections? Like the first language, how I heard of it, Languages I learned after words, who inspired me. Like that?

Gideon Zhi

Quote from: InfamousKnight on August 28, 2013, 10:19:32 PM
Yeah, I have a lot of trouble with organizing.. I'll write paragraphs on my own time for practice. Do you mean put everything into sections? Like the first language, how I heard of it, Languages I learned after words, who inspired me. Like that?

I dunno, I didn't read it. Too disorganized. I was actually talking about proper indentation and linebreaks - code formatting - but it applies to your writing style too!

Bregalad

Your keyboard possesses an <Enter> key.
Please use it and we'll be able to read your post, and possibly respond.

InfamousKnight

Quote from: Bregalad on August 29, 2013, 03:04:07 AM
Your keyboard possesses an <Enter> key.
Please use it and we'll be able to read your post, and possibly respond.

I don't see authors doing that in novels! Just read it left through right. Read it like you're reading a chapter book. Damn, you guys are picky!

Gideon Zhi

Quote from: InfamousKnight on August 29, 2013, 08:39:23 AM
I don't see authors doing that in novels! Just read it left through right. Read it like you're reading a chapter book. Damn, you guys are picky!

This actually explains a lot. Have you ever been evaluated for learning disabilities? (Please note that I'm being honest here, not trying to be hurtful!)

furrykef

Are you kidding me? Novels have paragraph breaks all the time. And yes, I think that post is a bit of an unreadable mess.

InfamousKnight

#9
Quote from: Gideon Zhi on August 29, 2013, 12:59:42 PM
This actually explains a lot. Have you ever been evaluated for learning disabilities? (Please note that I'm being honest here, not trying to be hurtful!)
EDIT: Post refurbished! Took me less then a minute to refurbish it as well :P

I think its safe to say that I just forgot to put line breaks. And that I rushed through that post.

Kiyoshi Aman

I feel I should point out that the more you read the more eloquently you'll be able to express yourself. It doesn't have to be excellent works like Lord of the Rings or Dune, either, as long as it's well-written. (Hint: Twilight and its sequels and fan-spinoffs (like 50 Shades of Gray) aren't.)

InfamousKnight

The only thing I really read are youtube descriptions. About speed runs and challenges in gaming.

My god I have said a lot of stupid shit. Another thing I have a LOT of trouble in is thinking before I talk. I really have to practice that. Not in public, probably when I'm writing a script. I have been told that a lot to think before I talk. Sometimes I don't even read that last set of words and say something I wasn't supposed to.

Bregalad

Now about the original questions...

QuoteAnyway, some teens were telling me about programming. They were saying it was really hard. They obviously had no passion in programming whatsoever. They say that making a game is really hard. Then they said that making an RPG is really hard. I love making RPGs. That's all I do in programming.
If they have no clue what programming is, how can they say it's terribly hard ? It's like saying "I never tried to climb on a mountain 'cause it's terribly hard". But you should at least give it a try.

QuoteUh, command prompt isn't a scripting or programming language at all. Its a freakin windows tool.
This is a subject to controversy. It's not a programming language, but it's definitely a step in this direction.
On old computers (like C64), the command prompt was a BASIC interpreter, so command line was a programming language.
shell files for linux can contain variables, if statements and for loops, so it can be considered a programming language. (not that this is not the ultimate criteria to what is a "programming language", but it's a good indication).

QuoteThen I thought I might learn some new languages like C++. And another thing I did wrong was use youtube to learn
My god how did you end up having a so terrible idea ?!
If you're so lazy you can't even read tutorials, then I have bad new about learning programming...

As for how I started programming, I learned languages in this order when I was 11 or so :
- 1st attempt at C++ (but I failed miserably, this is complicated stuff when you're 11 !)
- Microsoft Visual Basic simultaneously with C64 BASIC
- 6502 assembly
- other assemblies
- Delphi
- Java
- C
- so many other stuff it'd be pointless to list it here

BRPXQZME

Quote from: InfamousKnight on August 28, 2013, 08:47:50 PM
Oh, I forgot to mention what I language I started out with. To be honest, it was batch file scripting. I didn't even know it wasn't programming. Those teens that told me about programming were saying that command prompt was the first language.. Uh, command prompt isn't a scripting or programming language at all. Its a freakin windows tool.
They are mistaken. The first computers had hardly anything you could call a language, just machine code entered in on switches or punched cards or what have you. Though according to certain dogmas that the study of linguistics does not back up, the first language was Hebrew :thumbsup:

You are mistaken, too. The language in question is Turing-complete (you have to be a very scary kind of person to prove that, but it is), which is sufficient to be considered a programming language no matter how impractical (not all programming languages are Turing-complete, but it helps). And it's not a mere Windows tool by far! Even the Windows version of the command line has roots older than Windows. Older than DOS, even, what with DOS being a CP/M clone. But even there, a command line interface is very similar to (and quite possibly inspired by) a programming language concept called a REPL (read–eval–print loop), which is a simple name for "thingy where you type in lines of code (read), it runs them (eval), and it tells you the result (print), as many times as you'd like (loop)".
we are in a horrible and deadly danger

Bregalad

QuoteThe language in question is Turing-complete
So in theory, you could accomplish a very complex task such as compressing a file all in command line without calling an external binary program ?

InfamousKnight

Quote from: Bregalad on August 30, 2013, 02:06:08 AM
My god how did you end up having a so terrible idea ?!
If you're so lazy you can't even read tutorials, then I have bad new about learning programming...

Actually, I didn't really know any other way of learning. Youtube was just the first resource I used. And yes, that is a pretty bad start. I did start reading books after words. And using google as my new resource. I still want to learn more programming skills though.

And I'll be honest, I was lazy to read tutorials. Now I'm not like that anymore.

BRPXQZME

Quote from: Bregalad on August 30, 2013, 07:48:16 AM
So in theory, you could accomplish a very complex task such as compressing a file all in command line without calling an external binary program ?
In theory, yes, probably. You wouldn't want to try, but it could probably be demonstrated by breaking the problem down properly into things that you know can be done (and then "left as an exercise to the reader"). It might depend a bit on what is considered external; some shells don't see the need to keep certain commands internal. Certainly, any time you run into a memory limitation, things get more difficult to program. But it has variables, if, and goto, and that's all you technically need to do that.

Yet all that still strikes me as an arbitrary requirement ;)
we are in a horrible and deadly danger

Pikachumanson

Qbasic and looking at Qbasic programs off of AOL is how I started learning how to program.

ze10

My first programming experience was with RPG Maker 2000 (a version prior to the ones that allows the user to program in Ruby). Thanks to it I learned a lot about the logic of programming which helped me learning programming languages such as C, Java, Ruby etc.

furrykef

It struck me that I never actually answered the question in the thread title. (Guess I got sidetracked the first time around. :P)

Oddly enough I started programming before I ever had a 'real' computer. As a kid I had two toy computers, the "PC Pal" and the "Precomputer 1000". The PC Pal was really a toy (though it did let you make three-frame animations on an LCD with very large pixels!), but the Precomputer 1000 was basically only a small step removed from a real computer. As you can see in the image, it had only a one-line LCD. and you couldn't save anything. But it did have BASIC, and the manual had several BASIC programs in it. I dutifully typed them all in, and of course I began to notice how the commands actually worked. I probably didn't write any programs that were worth keeping, but the idea fascinated me, and naturally as soon as I got a computer I started playing around with QBASIC, which gave way to Visual Basic, then finally C, followed shortly by C++.