News: 11 March 2016 - Forum Rules

Author Topic: Identifying palettes in archive files  (Read 2857 times)

mikey3

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 26
    • View Profile
Identifying palettes in archive files
« on: April 01, 2013, 11:26:53 am »
How would you figure out if a file is a palette inside an archive?

Pikachumanson

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 607
    • View Profile
Re: Identifying palettes in archive files
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2013, 01:40:04 pm »
You are gonna have to put more detail than that when you ask a question. First off what console are you working on? Second the game name would be nice because each game stores it data differently.

henke37

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 643
    • View Profile
Re: Identifying palettes in archive files
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2013, 08:28:51 pm »
Palettes tend to be small. Palettes tend to look like gradients when viewed as direct color images. Palettes tend to be right next to the thing they are for.

mikey3

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 26
    • View Profile
Re: Identifying palettes in archive files
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2013, 11:38:58 am »
You are gonna have to put more detail than that when you ask a question. First off what console are you working on?
It's for DS.

Palettes tend to be small. Palettes tend to look like gradients when viewed as direct color images. Palettes tend to be right next to the thing they are for.
In that case, I think I found it. I don't think it's in standard format, because the magic stamp is NCL (it's also interesting that the other two types of files say NCG and NSC, I assume these are NCGR and NSCR) and because CT2 won't let me use it as a palette.

FAST6191

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3345
    • View Profile
Re: Identifying palettes in archive files
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2013, 01:40:31 pm »
It is far from a foolproof method* but you might also consider grabbing the palette from memory and searching the game for it- assuming it is packed in the archive (though in general it is a safer bet than most) it tends not to be worth the effort to compress a simple palette and you can then work backwards from there.

Failing that assuming you do not want to change it you can just use the emulator palette and rip/edit as you will.

*Among other things I have had games have dynamic colours (Summon Night - Swordcraft Story 2 on the GBA if you want an example) and I have had games change a single colour or a couple as an animation method (Mr Driller 2 is a nice example though the previous has a more subtle version of it).

RetroHelix

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
    • View Profile
Re: Identifying palettes in archive files
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2013, 02:07:24 pm »
For testing what you have identified as a palette you can use https://code.google.com/p/tiledggd/ . It lest you open a separate palette from file or by giving an offset.