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Topics - geishaboy

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Script Help and Language Discussion / Links for the budding translator
« on: September 04, 2013, 08:57:02 pm »
There seems to be a whole lot of people posting pretty basic questions in this section, many of which could easily be answered by using some fairly common translation tools. I'm going to go ahead and post a few links which help me out in times of need, and it would be awesome if any of the other translators posted some of their favourite links as well (DS I'm looking in your direction). Most (if not all) of these links are related to translating Japanese, but most (if not all) of the questions posted in this section are as well.

Handwritten Kanji Search http://kanji.sljfaq.org/
This little device has saved my bacon a few times. You use your mouse to literally draw the kanji you are looking for. It's is dependent on stroke order, but is also quite forgiving if you get a couple of strokes out of order.

Multiradical Kanji Lookup http://kanji.sljfaq.org/mr.html
This is from the same site as the handwritten lookup, only you select parts of the kanji (radicals) and it narrows the list down accordingly. There are a few of these around, however I like this one as it throws a few 'unofficial' radicals to the mix.

Lite Text Gloss http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/cgi-bin/wwwjdic.cgi?9T
With this site you simply type or paste in words you want looked up, and it spits them back out with Japanese readings and English meanings. It comes in handy now and then.

Space Alc http://www.alc.co.jp/
Space Alc is an online dictionary with user submitted (I think) definitions and example sentences. I mostly use it like a thesaurus; looking over the various ways a word can be translated in different contexts. Be warned though, some of the examples and definitions it gives can be very context specific and will not work outside of that given context.

Google Image Search (you need the url for that one do you?)
This is an old trick of the trade. Usually used as a last resort, when you just can't figure out what a word means, pop it into google image search (or any image search for that matter) and the images it brings up will normally give you some clues to the words meaning.

JLookUP http://www.jlookup.net/
This is dictionary program which uses the EDICT family of dictionaries. It's nothing special, really, except for that fact that it works offline. It's just a program that sits on your hard drive. It's not an amazing piece of software by any means, and seems to crash a lot, but if my internet goes down it's always there to help me out.

I would be interested to see what kinds of sites/tools that people are using, so if you have something useful, post it.

(First person to mention google translate gets a complimentary kick in the teeth)

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Personal Projects / Be My Sword! - English translation (PC)
« on: January 02, 2012, 02:21:18 am »
This isn't exactly a romhack, but...

Here is a quirky little game I have for you all called 私の剣になりなさい! which translates to  "be my sword!" (or something). I contacted the game designer directly and asked him how he would feel about working together to produce an English edition and he thought it was a great idea.



The creator goes by the name ReimonZ (礼門Z) and his web site can be found here: http://leimon.web.fc2.com/

You may notice that the game typically costs around a thousand yen (bundled with a few toher games), but thanks to my sweet talking you guys get it for free!

The reason I'm posting this here is that the translation still needs a bit more polish, there are (probably) spelling mistakes, odd grammar usage and messed up punctuation all through the game. If you play the game and notice and error please, for the love of god, post it here so I can have it fixed. I'm keen to move on to other projects so I am leaving this up to the patrons of romhacking.net because they totally super awesome cool and are going to help me with this beta release.

As for the game itself, well, the graphics may strike you as a bit amatureish (is that even a word?) but it is a lot of fun and definately worth a play. It supports gamepads and is best played with one, but a keyboard will work just fine too..

Better include a download link heh :http://www.vector.co.jp/download/file/winnt/game/fh566449.html

Any other comments or questions other than errors would be greatly appreciated. The game has earned a bit of popularity in the Japanese freeware scene and the creator is anxious to see how the English speaking world are going to like it.

EDIT: Gameplay video now uploaded to youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJCgErfdpZU

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The game I'm doing has a bunch of little single questions that pop up during the game and I'm struggling to find the right wording for one of them.

The question in question

ハシモトめいじんはパフパフがすきでしょうか

はい             いいえ

Hashimoto Meijin is the hero's name, so what it's asking is if he likes a bit of pafupafu. (I know I do!). Finding the right wording for this is doing my head in. Literally translated it sounds a lot dirtier in English than it does in Japanese and probably looses it's comic value、as well as that slight element of mystery.

You don't have to be a wiz at Japanese to help me with this. For those that can't speak Japanese or haven't heard of pafupafu before, it is a term that originated in the first dragon quest game. As in, you would go into a certain shop in the village and the girls there are all like "How about some pafupafu" and you are naturally all like "Aw hell yeah". I don't think it was really explained in the first game, but eventually the nerds of Japan decided it meant to put your head between a busty girls boobs and snuggle the shit out of them. Or rather pafupafu refers to the sound you make as you try to ignore oxygen for sweet, sweet boobage.

For the love of pafupafu help me out here.

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