Romhacking.net

Romhacking => Newcomer's Board => Topic started by: NERV Agent on September 06, 2017, 08:58:56 pm

Title: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 06, 2017, 08:58:56 pm
I recently bought a new laptop with Windows 10 on it. I wanted to downgrade to Windows 7 for "reasons", only to find that it is impossible. I called the manufacturer and "Will" tells me that "Windows 7 is not an option with this computer" because it is not ACPI compliant.

I guess he can sense my frustration over the phone, so he mentions Linux.

So maybe it is high time I ditched Windows and switched to Linux, although I have never used it before.

My concern is ROM hacking and emulator programs. These are the programs I usually use for ROM hacking:

- Microsoft Word
- Hex Workshop 4.2
- Jasc Paint Shop Pro 9
- CloneCD
- Cdmage
- Tile Molester
- Virtual CloneDrive 5.4.7.0
- ePSXe
- ZSNES
- vSNES v2.91
- SNESPal
- PVV v1.0

Are there Linux versions or Linux alternatives to these programs? I've heard of WINE, although I don't know too much about it. Would some of the PC programs listed above run under WINE?

Otherwise, I pretty much have a thousand dollar brick on a table that I'm not sure if I should just send back for a refund.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Jorpho on September 06, 2017, 10:41:52 pm
In my experience, many things are tantalizingly possible in Linux, but that just means you will spend more and more time chasing obscure user-supplied kludges in a desperate effort to get incrementally closer to what you could much more easily be doing in Windows – only to watch everything break again when one OS component or another needs to get upgraded.

WINE is pretty good these days and I expect many of those programs should run in WINE.  If you want to try it out, I believe the Knoppix Live CD still includes WINE – you can download it from http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html and either burn it to a CD or (with the right tools) install it to a bootable USB drive, and then experiment all you want without having to actually make any permanent changes to your hard drive.  There's also a WINE compatibility database out there somewhere.  If all else fails you can also run VMware on Linux and run Windows that way.

Tile Molester runs in Java, so as long as you can get Java running in Linux, you should be good there.  Linux also has Power ISO, which might be suitable for whatever you use CDmage for.  (The Windows port of Power ISO is not free.)  And Linux has native support for mounting ISO images, in theory.  ePSXe and ZSNES both have native Linux ports, if I'm not mistaken.

Probably the biggest stumbling block would be weird DRM features on older game discs, but those would be just as problematic under Windows 10.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 07, 2017, 01:15:17 am
Would it be possible to install Knoppix (or any Linux distribution that anyone else wants to recommend) on an SD flash card, and run it on the flash card like one would on a regular hard drive?

[personal rant mode]I'm so pissed off by this shit, and I do not need this along with an important job interview this week.[/personal rant mode]
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Jorpho on September 07, 2017, 09:27:50 am
Would it be possible to install Knoppix (or any Linux distribution that anyone else wants to recommend) on an SD flash card, and run it on the flash card like one would on a regular hard drive?
Like I said, many things are tantalizingly possible.  If your laptop has an option in its BIOS to allow you to boot from a flash card, then it should be easy enough; if it doesn't, it should be feasible to set up an appropriate boot manager.

A flash card is not ideal, since Linux tends to default to ext4 for its filesystem.  Like NTFS, it's a journaling file system, which means it makes extensive use of disk writes and will in theory wear out the flash card over time.  But perhaps that is a danger that tends to be overstated.

[personal rant mode]I'm so pissed off by this shit, and I do not need this along with an important job interview this week.[/personal rant mode]
Whatever your beef is with Windows 10, I do not forsee this as improving your quality of life.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: andrewclunn on September 07, 2017, 09:35:40 am
Honestly Wine is to a point where I'm able to run most Windows only hacking tools in Linux no problem.  There are native / cross platform tools for pixel image editing, patching, text editing, as well as emulators for pretty much every system.  Honestly the OS that really isn't a full blown citizen in the hacking scene right now is Mac.  If this is your first foray into Linux however, I recommend sticking to a fairly popular distro, as it will make finding and installing these applications easier.  That said Ubuntu is literally less than a month from releasing their next major release.  There are plenty of us here who run linux as our main OS.  There are reasons for or against it, but as far as the hacking / emulation scene goes, there's nothing that makes Windows a better choice at this point.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Bregalad on September 07, 2017, 09:55:09 am
Most linux distros are free so just try these out and see if you like it or not... It's always interesting to try out.

But also prepare to be disappointed, it's harder to use than windows and requires some "hacking" by changing system text files to get any non-standard thing (and sometimes even very standard things) done.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: andrewclunn on September 07, 2017, 11:05:03 am
How to fix linux.  Google search for a command you don't understand.  Put it into the terminal and hope and hope you don't break things.  How to fix Windows.  Restart the machine, potentially multiple times.  How to fix a Mac, buy a new one.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: FAST6191 on September 07, 2017, 11:47:17 am
If the emulator is open source there is likely a Linux version, however the debug versions don't always make it.

Wine is an option for many things, definitely worth a go too.

I use Linux as my main operating system and have done since windows XP ended.

Microsoft Word... give or take the thread the other day about android versions of MS office I can't think of a hacking reason why libreoffice would fail you. If you are doing something where a single bit of errant formatting might cost you then I would hope you are using a proper typesetting program.
That said much beyond typing, spell checking, automated replacement of terms and word count I can not think of much why you would want Word and all its baggage. I often use spreadsheets as number manipulation but don't tend to find myself with a basic document editor when hacking as they are all too clunky for scripts.

Hex workshop and 010 editor at the two best general purpose editors I have ever seen, only really specialist stuff like https://www.x-ways.net/winhex/ comes close. You can get most of the functionality from free programs (mirkes.de tiny hexer, https://sourceforge.net/projects/hexplorer/ and might as well add , however notice open source was not necessarily part of that and thus that means Linux has a bit of trouble here. Hex workshop is also my general purpose editor of choice.

Bless is usually the basic Linux hex editor, and sort of in line with XVI32 if you lose the scripting or HxD in terms of basic but doable things. I have not toyed with https://www.openhub.net/p/heraia (the other main choice for a basic Linux based graphical hex editor) in a few years at this point.

"Jasc Paint Shop Pro 9"
I have not use PSP since the 90s, maybe once more if it came bundled with a laptop.
It has Gimp though and it is wonderful.
Even better is Linux tends to have support for nice old drawing tablets that Wacom ended support for when XP was still current, but still work just fine.

"CloneCD,  Cdmage, Virtual CloneDrive 5.4.7.0"
Sounds like you have a workflow going on there. I tend not to go for PS1 and such like as my everyday hacking which I guess is where many of those come in. Basic iso mounting is far nicer on Linux, all the complicated stuff which consoles bring to the table are probably harder (a few months back I was dealing with the complicated nonsense that GPS devices have since they lost the FAT32 lawsuit however many years ago, Linux allowed me to cut through it like butter in a way Windows never would have)

I keep three windows machines around these days.
1) Video editing. Avisynth is my weapon of choice for video editing, Linux has some great stuff in things like kdenlive but just can't find something with a workflow I like as much as avisynth.
2) Video capture. Mainly as I am too cheap to buy a new capture card and the one I have works really well for 90% of the stuff I want to do with it.
3) My little netbook. Runs XP, still has working activex, internet exploder, brutish old versions of SMB and what have you. If I am on site somewhere it happily talks to all the old routers, security camera systems and crap that people have paid thousands for and find underpinning their business or something that would be very expensive not to have available to you.

1) also doubles as my ROM hacking machine. I can look at things in a hex editor in Linux and often do, and do some basic cheat finding but if it gets serious Windows is still where it is at.

That said other than some of the really high end emulation aspects, even then it is not so bad as you are not necessarily playing and instead just figuring something out, a virtual machine is good for this sort of thing. Means your OS is basically a file and you can transfer it to new machines, back it up (so if you think something may break a system or take it down a path you don't want you can just copy it and have a backup or have a second machine to send down that odd path) and otherwise take it with you just you would any other file.

*these days with graphic card passthrough and CPUs have virtualisation options much of the "slowness" is people squeezing the VM to run in no memory and the system maybe not having enough memory to do the VM and a browser with 400 tabs open).

As others have said do go with a popular version of Linux to begin with. Also maybe avoid arch linux. Every time I see someone suggest that to a newcomer I wonder to myself if they actually don't want said newcomer to take up this Linux lark.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 07, 2017, 08:09:36 pm
From what I've read in this thread, it seems that the jump from Windows to Linux should not be too conflicting since WINE and alternate Linux programs are available.

One more concern I have is my game controller. I have a rare 16 button game controller from Japan that's for Windows OSes. How would I got about making this work for Linux with all the features (like rumble) intact?

As for my brick, I have until the end of the month to return it. I am seriously considering buying a dedicated Linux laptop. I know that Dell sells laptops with Ubuntu installed, but it looks pricey and I'm on a budget. Are there any other PC vendors with good reputations that sell laptops with Linux installed and ready to use? I want to compare all reasonable options available.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Jorpho on September 07, 2017, 09:14:37 pm
That said Ubuntu is literally less than a month from releasing their next major release.
To me, that suggests it's about to be broken in new and exciting ways and that it will take a few months for the dust to settle.  But that's my opinion.

How to fix linux.  Google search for a command you don't understand.  Put it into the terminal and hope and hope you don't break things.  How to fix Windows.  Restart the machine, potentially multiple times.  How to fix a Mac, buy a new one.
The Oatmeal put it nicely.
http://theoatmeal.com/blog/fix_computer

the complicated nonsense that GPS devices have since they lost the FAT32 lawsuit however many years ago
I was wondering what you were referring to, but then I found the wiki article (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Corp._v._TomTom_Inc.).

One more concern I have is my game controller. I have a rare 16 button game controller from Japan that's for Windows OSes. How would I got about making this work for Linux with all the features (like rumble) intact?
The obvious first step is to search around and see if someone happens to have made an open source driver for this particular controller.  If the controller depends on an ordinary Windows app, then it might cooperate with WINE; if it requires an actual Windows driver, then that would probably be a problem (but if that's the case I am surprised you were able to get it to work at all with Windows 7 or Windows 10).  There's no real way to get arbitrary Windows drivers working with Linux – there was once a thing called ndiswrapper for use with wireless cards, but that was very controversial at the time and I don't think the project was subsequently expanded.

Conceivably, you could reverse-engineer the controller's USB signals and write your own driver, but that would likely be an enormous timesink.

Quote
I know that Dell sells laptops with Ubuntu installed, but it looks pricey and I'm on a budget. Are there any other PC vendors with good reputations that sell laptops with Linux installed and ready to use? I want to compare all reasonable options available.
Linux is at least fairly straightforward to install in most cases and I wouldn't pay extra to buy a laptop with Linux already installed.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 08, 2017, 06:28:17 am
If my rare and special 16 button controller from Japan doesn't work, that would suck.

Is XBOX 360 USB controller support good on Linux? Or if I've feeling absurdly old school, Microsoft Sidewinder?
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Bregalad on September 08, 2017, 08:00:53 am
I wanted to downgrade to Windows 7 for "reasons", only to find that it is impossible. I called the manufacturer and "Will" tells me that "Windows 7 is not an option with this computer" because it is not ACPI compliant.
How far you actually searched this path ? Because your vendor do not support Windows 7 downgrades does not mean this is impossible. In many cases it's even possible to install XP on modern PCs, but you'll have a couple of driver issues and won't be able to take advantage of all RAM - but this is a low price to pay in order to have a fully usable operating system far from the modern shit that there is.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Jorpho on September 08, 2017, 08:36:04 am
Is XBOX 360 USB controller support good on Linux? Or if I've feeling absurdly old school, Microsoft Sidewinder?
I haven't tried it personally, but the Googles say yes.

You can expect to be doing a whole lot of Googling if you start using Linux.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 08, 2017, 03:05:43 pm
How far you actually searched this path ? Because your vendor do not support Windows 7 downgrades does not mean this is impossible. In many cases it's even possible to install XP on modern PCs, but you'll have a couple of driver issues and won't be able to take advantage of all RAM - but this is a low price to pay in order to have a fully usable operating system far from the modern shit that there is.

That is another problem that's a pain in my balls. No XP driver support. If there was XP driver support, I wouldn't even bother with Windows 7 to begin with. Hell, I probably wouldn't even need to buy a new PC and would just install XP on my current machine already if it wasn't an issue. But I really need to make use of an NVIDIA GPU for hacking and playing PS1 games, and hopefully even PS2 games some day. That Intel High Diarrhea Graphics won't cut it.

This is the computer I bought.

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA8S15UZ3741&cm_re=n857hk1-_-9SIA8S15UZ3741-_-Product

It all started when I tried to downgrade to Windows 7 Pro by booting to a Windows 7 Pro disc inside of an external drive connected to the laptop.

The Windows 7 installation stalls with a red bar on top.

So I called Eluktronics Contact Phone Number. "Will" told me to disable UEFI boot from the BIOS. So I did just that.

Afterwards, I get a BSoD saying that the BIOS is not ACPI compliant. "Will" tells me that this means that "Windows 7 is not an option with this computer."

Moreover, yesterday "Will" also informed me that Linux might not be fully supported on the machine as well, just to add a cherry on top of the shit sundae.

I checked some YouTube videos about a "legacy" BIOS option that works for some computers like Dell and such. But this computer has no such option in the BIOS.

Now if I could somehow make the BIOS ACPI compliant, I probably won't have to return this brick before the end of the month.

But learning Linux might be a hassle in the short term, but will be a long term solution to this planned obsolescence scam.

I just gotta pass that job interview so I can have enough income to shell out for that more expensive Dell Ubuntu laptop and return the brick sitting on one of my tables taking up space.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: candidosobrinho.sa on September 08, 2017, 03:50:38 pm
I recently bought a new laptop with Windows 10 on it. I wanted to downgrade to Windows 7 for "reasons", only to find that it is impossible. I called the manufacturer and "Will" tells me that "Windows 7 is not an option with this computer" because it is not ACPI compliant.

Have you tried switching couple options on your UEFI? Probably something like "OS Compatibility", setting Legagy boot (this will automatically disable Secure Boot).

- Microsoft Word
- Hex Workshop 4.2
- Jasc Paint Shop Pro 9
- CloneCD
- Cdmage
- Tile Molester
- Virtual CloneDrive 5.4.7.0
- ePSXe
- ZSNES
- vSNES v2.91
- SNESPal
- PVV v1.0

Except CDVBDs burning/mount softwares, all other programs works on Linux through Wine. I play Heroes of the Storm, StarCraft2 and other stuff with it.
ePSXe and other emulators are available natively for Windows.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Jorpho on September 08, 2017, 10:25:04 pm
It all started when I tried to downgrade to Windows 7 Pro by booting to a Windows 7 Pro disc inside of an external drive connected to the laptop.

The Windows 7 installation stalls with a red bar on top.
Getting to the bottom of this is probably going to be easier than at least 50% of the problems you'll have with Linux.  If that disturbs you, then don't go with Linux!

Is your external drive plugged into a USB 3.0 port?  I understand that is a common problem with Windows 7 installations – you need to make new installation media with USB 3.0 drivers slipstreamed into it.  In fact, Intel even has a utility for it now, though I'm not sure that will work for everything:
https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/25476/Windows-7-USB-3-0-Creator-Utility

The next Google hit was this guide:
https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/125921-how-to-add-drivers-manually-to-a-usb-drive-to-install-windows-7-using-a-usb-3-0-port


'Course, if that was the problem, you'd probably have gotten a "missing driver" error rather than this red bar...

A bit more Googling suggests you can try pressing F7 to skip the hardware check during Windows boot, or disabling your serial ports in the BIOS.
https://forums.techguy.org/threads/unable-to-install-windows-7-incompatible-bios.1129317/

I remember talking about slipstreaming with nLite once before on the forum that got deleted.  :(  Ideally, you should have KB3020369 (Servicing Stack), KB3125574 (Convenience Rollup), and KB3172605 (which will fix Windows Update afterwards).
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 09, 2017, 12:10:42 am
Yeah, I already fiddled with the startup options with F7, and it still wouldn't boot.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: tvtoon on September 09, 2017, 05:11:53 pm
Linux world is at the point of no return already, I don't recommend that you waste any new x86 machine with distros. If you want to do anything for hacking, I recommend using something in the line of Raspberry Pi, but you will be kept away from Windows applications for a while, as WINE is now targeting the ARM slowly, and there will be future use implications.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Bregalad on September 10, 2017, 12:04:23 pm
Quote
But learning Linux might be a hassle in the short term, but will be a long term solution to this planned obsolescence scam.
Do you know there is just as much "planned obsolescence" in Linux ? In some points it might be even worse with new gimmicky useless features.

Quote
Getting to the bottom of this is probably going to be easier than at least 50% of the problems you'll have with Linux.  If that disturbs you, then don't go with Linux!
+1

Quote
Linux world is at the point of no return already, I don't recommend that you waste any new x86 machine with distros.
Perhaps if you would actually tell what the problem is instead of just ranting without any clue about what, your post could be constructive and helpful.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: tvtoon on September 10, 2017, 03:35:56 pm
Perhaps if you would actually tell what the problem is instead of just ranting without any clue about what, your post could be constructive and helpful.
I will keep it bright like you think of yourself: it won't grow like Linux people want to grow, it shouldn't try that route anymore and the holders of the biggest score are way out of this game already (Google). Was it clear enough for you? :)
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Bregalad on September 11, 2017, 02:11:49 am
No. You could just as well write you posts in Chinese I would understand the same amount of information (that is, zero).
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: columbo on September 11, 2017, 06:55:30 pm
I've been using Linux almost exclusively for over a decade.  Some stuff definitely works better under actual Windows, but even the latest Windows doesn't run all the older Windows stuff as good as it should.

It really comes down to personal preference.  Wine can run a lot of stuff.  That being said, there are definitely problems you'll encounter with Wine.  Also, depending on what you want to run, you'll have better luck with various versions of Wine.

I wouldn't go as far as to recommend a Linux OS to anyone, but it's what I use and prefer.  I manually get my updates through the command line, and I don't miss Windows restarting the computer to upgrade in the middle of writing and important paper.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: C_CliFF on September 13, 2017, 06:44:15 am
Just a little tip for those who didn't know and just starting using wine.

When I first started, there were 50/50 chance of getting a program to run. Most of the time, when I tried to run it, nothing happened. That was before I ran it through wines command prompt.

Just type in terminal wine cmd and then navigate to the program you want to run and try to run it from there.

Here you will see what causing it not to run. Most of the time it could just be a missing dll-file, but there could also be that you didn't install a package or font file. You can use winetricks for that. It can also be a memory issue which will be harder to solve but you can google the error you get and hopefully others have had the same issue and solved it.

Now I get around 90-95% of the programs I use in Romhacking.

Anyway just a tip.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 14, 2017, 08:17:37 pm
I'm reading both positive and negative viewpoints on Linux in this thread, but I still think it's worth learning at some point. Today I'm getting weird warnings in Windows 7 about security programs being shut off, despite the fact that my McAfee Antivirus is up an running. Yeah, I'm getting pretty sick and tired of this post-XP shit.

If WINE doesn't work for some programs, I'll resort to using the free version of VMware Workstation Player. What I hope I can do is use a laptop with similar specs to the one I got off of Newegg, and run VMWare to emulate a Windows XP 64-bit PC with 2 processors, 2GB RAM, and 3D graphics acceleration. I'd do all my ROM hacking and gaming stuff in VMWare, and all the serious business stuff in Linux (since XP security updates will be dropped).

Would such a thing be feasible?

Also, what is the difference between the free version of VMware Workstation Player and the paid version?
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Jorpho on September 14, 2017, 10:52:16 pm
and run VMWare to emulate a Windows XP 64-bit PC with 2 processors, 2GB RAM, and 3D graphics acceleration.
64-bit would be entirely redundant in such a scenario.  You certainly don't want to be running the 64-bit version of XP, and with only 2 GB of RAM there would be no benefit to doing so.

Quote
Also, what is the difference between the free version of VMware Workstation Player and the paid version?
I'm not entirely sure, especially as it's gone through some changes over the yars.  I think it amounts to advanced administration capabilities for which a home user would have no particular use.  I thought I read something somewhere about the paid version having scaling capability (i.e. so you can run a guest OS at 640x480 but have it fill the entirety of a 1680x1050 monitor), but I could be wrong on that.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Voyaging on September 15, 2017, 10:37:16 pm
Sorry if I missed you already explaining it, but what exactly is your reason for not wanting to use Windows 10? You use tons of software that will run poorly if at all on Linux. I don't see why you'd ever want to use Linux over Windows in this case. And given you wanted to use Windows 7, I can't understand why you'd be so adamant not to use Windows 10. Linux is for users who don't need Windows software that doesn't run well on WINE.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 17, 2017, 06:47:22 am
Er, if you've been keeping up with the news, Windows 10 is pretty much adware by Microsoft. Also, it's been my constant painful experience that every time a new Windows OS comes up, the increased resource consumption rapes my computer harder than Boku No Pico at a NAMBLA meeting. So if Windows 7 is a creepy pedophile rapist having his way with my computer, then Windows 10 is a tentacle monster rapist.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Gemini on September 17, 2017, 09:06:07 am
Just disable telemetry (there are tons of scripts to do so) and it should be bearable, mostly. It will still have the crappy UI and retardedly inconsistent system dialogs, but hey, if that's the best viable option go for it.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Voyaging on September 19, 2017, 02:14:55 pm
Er, if you've been keeping up with the news, Windows 10 is pretty much adware by Microsoft. Also, it's been my constant painful experience that every time a new Windows OS comes up, the increased resource consumption rapes my computer harder than Boku No Pico at a NAMBLA meeting. So if Windows 7 is a creepy pedophile rapist having his way with my computer, then Windows 10 is a tentacle monster rapist.

Windows 10 is probably the best performing OS since XP, so there's no concern with system performance or excessive resource usage unless your computer is very old and specced poorly.

There's also no adware so I'm not sure what you're referring to. In years I've never seen a single advertisement that wasn't directly caused by the site I was visiting.

If you're talking about privacy, and Microsoft's collection of data, then that's true, but it's virtually impossible to avoid personal data collection without avoiding using the Web altogether, or being outrageously strict with what software you use (no Google or any of its services, for example, only fully free Linux distros which are shit, etc.).

Apologies if that's not what you were referring to by "adware".
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Jorpho on September 20, 2017, 08:59:46 am
Quote
Windows 10 is probably the best performing OS since XP, so there's no concern with system performance or excessive resource usage unless your computer is very old and specced poorly.
There's been plenty of grousing about the compatibility layer for older versions of DirectX.  Oddly enough, one solution is to bring in DLLs using WineD3D's implementation.

There's also no adware so I'm not sure what you're referring to. In years I've never seen a single advertisement that wasn't directly caused by the site I was visiting.
What about on the lock screen?  I don't use Windows 10 myself, but http://toastytech.com/guis/win10.html suggests as much.  One could possibly argue that the integration of Microsoft's online services also constitutes "advertising".
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 20, 2017, 04:15:38 pm
If you're talking about privacy, and Microsoft's collection of data, then that's true, but it's virtually impossible to avoid personal data collection without avoiding using the Web altogether, or being outrageously strict with what software you use (no Google or any of its services, for example, only fully free Linux distros which are shit, etc.).

I'm already pretty strict about privacy and programs on my PC. And I don't even use Facebook or any of that crap. Personally, I have witnessed stuff like identity theft and people being doxed IRL (and it even hit close to home), and it's not fun. I'm willing to learn how to use Linux distros and/or being strict with privacy settings if it helps steer me away from all the shit I've personally witnessed. And with all the talk of blackhat hackers today hacking elections*, Equifax, ransomware in hospitals, etc. you can't be too careful.

Also, as I may have mentioned before, I'm not to keen on buying a new PC every couple of years because of Micro$oft's planned obsolescence scheme, with each new Windows iteration being even worse than the one before it. I've got other bills to pay.

Anyway, I passed my job interview so I'm returning this fucking brick and plan on getting a Linux machine from Dell. If I understand correctly, Dell will even provide Linux tech support for their Linux machine.

http://toastytech.com/guis/win10.html

^THIS

*Please don't derail thread with political drama.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Voyaging on September 20, 2017, 08:10:30 pm
There's been plenty of grousing about the compatibility layer for older versions of DirectX.  Oddly enough, one solution is to bring in DLLs using WineD3D's implementation.
What about on the lock screen?  I don't use Windows 10 myself, but http://toastytech.com/guis/win10.html suggests as much.  One could possibly argue that the integration of Microsoft's online services also constitutes "advertising".

Dunno but I have never once seen the Lock Screen display anything other than the default image, and I have my account set with a password so I've seen the Lock Screen probably a few thousand times. So I'm really not sure what the deal is with ppl seeing ads.

Fair enough re: integration of their online services. I agree and I'd certainly rather them not integrate e.g. OneDrive and instead have an option for integration of Google Drive or Dropbox or whatever you choose. Not sure if there is any service integration other than OneDrive, that's the only one I can think of.

I'm already pretty strict about privacy and programs on my PC. And I don't even use Facebook or any of that crap. Personally, I have witnessed stuff like identity theft and people being doxed IRL (and it even hit close to home), and it's not fun. I'm willing to learn how to use Linux distros and/or being strict with privacy settings if it helps steer me away from all the shit I've personally witnessed. And with all the talk of blackhat hackers today hacking elections*, Equifax, ransomware in hospitals, etc. you can't be too careful.

Also, as I may have mentioned before, I'm not to keen on buying a new PC every couple of years because of Micro$oft's planned obsolescence scheme, with each new Windows iteration being even worse than the one before it. I've got other bills to pay.

Anyway, I passed my job interview so I'm returning this fucking brick and plan on getting a Linux machine from Dell. If I understand correctly, Dell will even provide Linux tech support for their Linux machine.

^THIS

*Please don't derail thread with political drama.

Fair enough, I disagree with your assessment, though I share your concern with personal data collection. As for planned obsolescence, Microsoft typically offers free upgrades to the newest version of Windows for people who have the previous version, so they don't really have much to gain by using planned obsolescence tactics. That would mostly benefit the hardware manufacturers.

In any case, if you're looking for maximum privacy, there's a pretty sweet site that suggests software to avoid data collection, surveillance, and privacy invasion at https://prism-break.org/en/.

The Dell Linux laptops I believe come with Ubuntu preinstalled, and Ubuntu has had adware concerns far worse than Windows and macOS have had (they at one point bundled Amazon search in the main OS search). They've since removed it, but it's a worthy concern. I personally still prefer Ubuntu. The PRISM Break site suggests Debian and Fedora instead, which are both great. You'll want to do a Google search on the laptop you intend on buying and its hardware compatibility with whatever distro you plan on using (if you plan on replacing Ubuntu). Some hardware requires proprietary drivers to run, which certain distros either don't allow at all, or else need to have the repos manually added. You may also want to look into any privacy intrusive software, drivers, binary blobs that come preinstalled on the laptop by Dell.

If you want to go uber extreme, you'll want to look into the GNU movement at https://www.gnu.org, if you haven't already, and use one of their recommended distros. Fair warning that limiting yourself to fully free software will limit both the hardware that will be compatible as well as what you're able to do as far as software, and is only really worthwhile if you're a Stallman-esque ideologue regarding software being fully free as a right. Their list of suggested distros is small and extremely limiting in terms of what software is available, as well as hardware compatibility. To be thorough, you would of course also have to completely abstain from ever using Google or any of their services, any social media, YouTube, and so on. IMO excessive.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: NERV Agent on September 23, 2017, 08:41:35 pm
As for planned obsolescence, Microsoft typically offers free upgrades to the newest version of Windows for people who have the previous version, so they don't really have much to gain by using planned obsolescence tactics. That would mostly benefit the hardware manufacturers.

The same hardware manufacturers that intentionally make their hardware not backwards compatible.

So let's say your average computer user needs to buy a new PC, because their old one got crushed and run over by a steamroller or something.

They will buy a new PC, but it has Windows 10 on it. But there is the option to buy the PC with no OS to save money, and this person might be lucky enough to have a Windows 7 installation disc lying around. Unfortunately, the hardware (in my case, the motherboard) is incompatible with every previous Windows version, so the common consumer has little choice but to purchase Windows 10.

It's a case of "you scratch my back, I'll scratch yours".

I will keep an eye out for any ad-ware on the Dell Ubuntu laptop. That I did not expect....
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Jorpho on September 23, 2017, 11:46:24 pm
Microsoft typically offers free upgrades to the newest version of Windows for people who have the previous version
What on Earth are you talking about?  They've done that exactly once, with Windows 10.  That was not in the least bit "typical".

Quote
The PRISM Break site suggests Debian and Fedora instead, which are both great.
I spent far too much time messing with Fedora.  Better to go with CentOS instead, I think, though I understand that's pretty much Fedora with slightly more assurances about stability.

They will buy a new PC, but it has Windows 10 on it. But there is the option to buy the PC with no OS to save money, and this person might be lucky enough to have a Windows 7 installation disc lying around. Unfortunately, the hardware (in my case, the motherboard) is incompatible with every previous Windows version, so the common consumer has little choice but to purchase Windows 10.
The switch from BIOS to UEFI was a major and long overdue switch.  That sort of thing doesn't happen everyday.

Anyway, from the limited searching I did, I'm still not entirely unconvinced that this "not ACPI compliant" error you received is completely insurmountable.

[By the way, is the General Forum never going to make a return?]
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Voyaging on September 24, 2017, 11:15:35 pm
What on Earth are you talking about?  They've done that exactly once, with Windows 10.  That was not in the least bit "typical".

Windows 7 to 8.1 upgrade was also free, making both of the last two operating systems free upgrades.

Plus Microsoft have already announced that W10 is the last version so -- if that's true -- the problem is moot as all future updates will presumably be free.

I will keep an eye out for any ad-ware on the Dell Ubuntu laptop. That I did not expect....

Yeah, they've since removed it after intense backlash from the community, but I figured it's something important to mention since you're trying to avoid adware and privacy invasion as much as possible.

It's no longer relevant for the current iteration of Ubuntu, but more of just a reason to be wary about the company that develops it, Canonical.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: Jorpho on September 25, 2017, 08:54:08 am
Windows 7 to 8.1 upgrade was also free, making both of the last two operating systems free upgrades.
I acknowledge that I could be mistaken, but I don't recall hearing anything about that. (The upgrade from Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 was free, though.)  I did some Googling and could only find references to buying that upgrade (ref (http://winsupersite.com/windows-8/windows-81-tip-upgrade-windows-7), ref (http://newatlas.com/upgrade-windows-7-to-windows-81/29746/), ref (https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/update-windows7-to-windows-81), ref (https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-update-to-windows-8-1-2626252)), though I acknowledge I could also be Googling wrong.
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: KingMike on September 25, 2017, 01:14:07 pm
Plus Microsoft have already announced that W10 is the last version so -- if that's true -- the problem is moot as all future updates will presumably be free.
Windows 10 the last version of Windows? :D
(not unless they go the Apple route of releasing new versions as decimal points. I don't follow them but I haven't heard of an OS11 being made yet, after OS10 came out in, what, 2001?)
Title: Re: ROM hacking on Linux? I never even used Linux.
Post by: FAST6191 on September 25, 2017, 10:05:01 pm
Windows 10 the last version of Windows? :D
(not unless they go the Apple route of releasing new versions as decimal points. I don't follow them but I haven't heard of an OS11 being made yet, after OS10 came out in, what, 2001?)

The consumer PC market is usually seen to be either shrinking or dying on its arse*, seemingly to phone and web/mainframe/cloud. MS seems to slowly be pulling out of the small business arena, seemingly in favour of web/mainframe/cloud for those or trying to shuffle them up to big boy stuff. They make Windows 10 into another XP like zombie and I can see a radically different approach being needed by the time it, or the install media, gets too long in the tooth.

*see also Dell going private and some of the ideas of what will happen there, mainly people riding the inertia into the ground for the next however many years.