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The $400 dungeon crawler: Madou Monogatari I: Honoo no Sotsuenji translation released

14 December 2020 8:56AM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

LIPEMCO! Translations is proud to present a complete English translation of Madou Monogatari Ⅰ: Honoo no Sotsuenji (Sorcery Saga Ⅰ: The Fiery Kindergarten Graduation) for the PC-Engine CD!

Sorcery Kindergarten has very strict requirements for graduation. Indeed, this year, only one person even qualified to take the final exam at all: six-year-old Arle Nadja, who now faces the daunting task of climbing the monster-infested Magic Tower and retrieving the three Magic Orbs hidden within in order to graduate. What trials await Arle inside the Tower? Can she pass the test, or will she be doomed to another year of kindergarten?

Madou Monogatari Ⅰ is a 1996 dungeon crawler for the PC-Engine Super CD-ROM² system. It’s a remake of the first game in the Madou Monogatari series, originally developed by Compile for the MSX2 computer and subsequently ported to several other platforms. The various ports differ wildly from each other, sometimes to the point of being almost completely different games; though the PC-Engine version is based on the original home computer editions, it adds high-quality cutscenes, CD audio, near-full voice acting, and many extra events, monsters, and items.

Released in limited quantities at the very, very end of the PC-Engine’s lifespan, the game is somewhat notorious for its rarity, often fetching the equivalent of $400+ in Japanese auctions on the rare occasion it’s sold at all. It’s also one of a very small number of games to require the use of the Arcade Card RAM expansion peripheral.

This patch fully translates the game into English. In addition to translating the text, it also adds subtitles to all voice-only cutscenes.

This project was the work of LIPEMCO! Translations: Supper (hacking), TheMajinZenki (translation), cccmar (editing and testing), and Xanathis (testing). The same group has also produced translations for several other games in the series, including Madou Monogatari II and Madou Monogatari III for the Game Gear, as well as the Mega Drive version of this game, which despite sharing the title has drastically different content.

The authors hope you’ll enjoy this rare and unusual game!

Before the EDF, there was the TDF: PSX mecha action game Remote Control Dandy translated

18 November 2020 6:16AM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

An English translation of the PlayStation mecha action game Remote Control Dandy, the first by Earth Defense Force developer Sandlot (in all but name), has been released!

In 1999, twelve-year-old Mamoru Oza, heir to the largest fortune in the world, received two gifts from his father. The first: A simple handheld remote controller…which operated the fifty-meter-tall combat robot “Vordan”. The second: Ownership of the newly-established Torino Defense Force Co., Ltd, a company formed to combat the “Enigmabots” – mysterious giant robots rampaging through the world’s major cities. Remote in hand, Mamoru now finds himself the sole hope of survival for the people of Torino City.

Can a boy, his robot, and a single remote solve the riddle of the Enigmabots and save the world…without going bankrupt first?

Remote Control Dandy is a 1999 mecha action game by Human Entertainment for the Sony PlayStation. In a major departure from most mecha games, it hearkens back to giant robot shows of the ’50s and ’60s such as Tetsujin 28-gou, in which the robots, rather than containing a human pilot, are controlled from afar via remote. The game adopts this as its core mechanic: not only does the player have to contend with remotely navigating their robot in the manner of an RC car, but also personally run after it to keep it in sight, all while not getting stepped on by enemy robots.

Though the game was nominally developed and published by Human Entertainment (known for the Clock Tower and Fire Pro Wrestling series), Human went bankrupt a few months after its release, with almost all of the game’s key staff members subsequently founding the game studio Sandlot and going on to develop the successful Earth Defense Force series. Thus, Remote Control Dandy is essentially the first Sandlot game; it bears all the hallmarks of their unique brand of outsize destruction, and it’s received the occasional nod or oblique reference in their later games. Particularly, the 2002 game Robot Alchemic Drive is essentially a spiritual sequel to this one – and Sandlot would even go on to make an actual Tetsujin 28-gou game!

This patch fully translates the game into English. Aside from the text, subtitles have been added to scenes which were originally voice-only, and all in-level textures such as billboards are also translated (the ones that were legible, anyway). Video of the translation in action can be viewed here.

The patch was the work of TheMajinZenki (translation), Supper (hacking), cccmar (editing and testing), and Xanathis (testing). Due to having worked on a large number of projects together, and in an attempt to resolve a frequent source of confusion, this team has decided to adopt the name “LIPEMCO! Translations” for their collaborative projects. They hope the partnership will continue to be a fruitful one.

Those interested in this game may also want to check out the fan translation of Sandlot’s Nintendo DS title Chou Soujuu Mecha MG, released last year by Phantom, Supper, and cccmar; the games share many conceptual similarities.

Half-game, half-manual: Mega Drive strategy game Bahamut Senki translated

03 June 2020 1:53PM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

An English translation for Sega’s 1991 Mega Drive/Genesis strategy game Bahamut Senki – and its accompanying 112-page instruction manuals – has been released!

For 2,000 years did the peace brought to Bahamut by the royal line of Pholia last; but no more. The skies darken, the evil powers once banished return, calamities tear the land itself asunder – and the “Age of Darkness” is at hand. As the world crumbles, eight rulers raise armies and war amongst themselves to decide the fate of the continent. None can say when or how the Age of Darkness will end, but amidst the chaos, there is one certainty: that the conflict can be done only when one Master stands alone above them all…

Bahamut Senki (Record of the Bahamut War) is a 1991 turn-based strategy game by Sega for the Mega Drive. In it, up to four players take control of one of eight rulers in the fantasy realm of Bahamut, raise armies, and battle AI opponents and each other until one faction emerges victorious. It’s a very complex and advanced game for its time, featuring three rulesets of varying depth, adjustable difficulty, and three different levels of simulation: high-level political management, tactical battles (in both hex-based and simplified variants), and real-time action-based combat between individual units.

While the game itself contains only a moderate amount of text, it’s a complex simulation game from an era where in-game help and tutorials were rare. Instead, most information on how the game actually works is found only in its 64-page instruction manual and accompanying 48-page supplement. Since the game is nearly impossible to understand without them, the translation team has additionally translated both manuals and formatted them as web pages, including translated reproductions of all charts and graphs, for convenience. They are included in the patch download, and can also be read online on the patch’s support site: http://stargood.org/trans/bahamut.php

The game also has a few unusual secrets for a strategy game of this type. Since some of them are extremely well hidden, and in some cases had never been documented in English, the patch download also includes instructions on how to find them.

This release was the work of TheMajinZenki (translation), Supper (hacking and manual digitization), cccmar (editing and testing), Xanathis (testing), and Oddoai-sama (testing). Special thanks to filler, who initially worked on the translation, and to Sega wiki Sega Retro for providing the user manual scans.

Game Gear's first ‹RPG›, Eternal Legend, ‹translated›

19 May 2020 1:17PM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

An English ‹translation› for the Game Gear’s first ‹RPG›, Eternal Legend, has been ‹released›.

‹Legend› tells of the ‹lost city› of ‘Millennium’, a golden ‹paradise› created to praise the ‹gods›. It is said that the bearer of the eight [Golden Knives] shall open the way to ‘Millennium’ and its long-lost ‹treasures› and ‹technology›. One day, «Arwyn», a young ‹treasure hunter›, unexpectedly finds himself caught up in the ‹search› for ‘Millennium’. In a ‹journey› spanning the entire ‹world›, «Arwyn», together with companions «Ryall» and «Blue Moon», must solve ‹mysteries› and uncover ‹conspiracies› from across the ages in order to learn the ‹secret› of ‘Millennium’…

Eternal Legend is a 1991 RPG developed by Japan Art Media for the Sega Game Gear. It’s a very orthodox RPG notable mostly for being the very first one on the Game Gear. It features vast overworlds based on real-world continents, a simple monster summoning mechanic, and a highly idiosyncratic system of ‹text bracketing›.

As the first RPG on the console, the game is unfortunately a bit primitive in some respects. In an attempt to make it slightly more palatable to modern players, the translation also includes a complete game walkthrough and provides optional cheats to speed up movement and prevent random encounters, though players interested in the original experience can forgo these if they prefer.

This patch was the work of TheMajinZenki (translation), Supper (hacking), and cccmar (editing and testing). The authors hope that you’ll enjoy the game, despite all ‹obstacles›.

Lighting the dark side of the Moon: Sailor Moon for PC-Engine CD translation released

20 April 2020 9:17AM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

An English translation of Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon for the PC-Engine CD/TurboGrafx CD has been released!

Following the Makai Tree incident and the departure of Ail and An, the five Sailor Senshi enjoy a newfound period of peace. With no enemies to fight, they return to their colorful, but ordinary, daily lives. But one night, Luna and Artemis sense several mysterious shadows releasing dark energy – energy like that of a Youma. Could the vanquished Dark Kingdom have somehow returned? The Senshi have dark secrets to uncover, and enemies old and new alike to face…if they can ever stop goofing off at the arcade.

Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon (Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon) for the PC-Engine Super CD-ROM² system is a 1994 visual novel based on the famous manga/anime franchise of the same name. A self-described “adventure-style digital comic”, it has an original story set between the Makai Tree and Black Moon arcs of the Sailor Moon R anime. All five of the Inner Senshi are available as playable characters, each with their own story; their five separate plots overlap to form a larger whole. It features extensive voice acting from the cast of the TV show, as well as two original vocal songs.

In addition to translating the text, the patch adds subtitles to all voice-only scenes, and adds both transliterated and translated subtitles to song lyrics. It also includes an in-game bonus gallery of unused art and sound assets that were discovered during production of the translation. And for those who might prefer it, an alternate edition of the patch is also provided which retains Japanese honorifics and certain Japanese terminology.

This patch was the work of TheMajinZenki (translation), Supper (hacking), cccmar (editing and testing), and Xanathis (testing). Additionally, the game’s vocal songs were subtitled using William A. Braell’s existing translation of the lyrics. Special thanks also goes to Aerialrave, who provided a helpful tip that, despite not working out quite as planned, was instrumental in the translation being made.

The authors hope Sailor Moon and PC-Engine fans alike will enjoy the game!

And 1 for Arle: Madou Monogatari I for Sega Mega Drive/Genesis translated

15 February 2020 12:37PM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

An English translation of the classic dungeon crawler Sorcery Saga Ⅰ (Madou Monogatari Ⅰ) for the Sega Mega Drive has been released!

It’s the day of the graduation exam at Magic Kindergarten, but only one person has qualified to take it: the promising mage but uninspiring student Arle Nadja, who fluked into passing the preliminary by choosing random answers. Now, Arle finds herself unexpectedly facing the school’s terrifying final exam: to escape from the massive, monster-infested Magic Tower in the playground. Will Arle make it out? And more importantly, can she earn enough points to pass her exam and graduate from kindergarten?

Sorcery Saga Ⅰ for the Mega Drive is a 1996 dungeon crawler by Compile. It’s nominally a remake of the first episode of the Madou Monogatari 1-2-3 trilogy, originally released for the MSX2 home computer in 1990, but aside from the basic story premise and a few gameplay concepts, it’s essentially a completely new game. Turn-based combat has been scrapped in favor of a fighting game–inspired action battle system, the dungeon layouts are completely different, and a new system for catching and battling with monsters plays a prominent role. It also holds the distinction of being the very last game officially released for the Mega Drive in Japan.

This patch was the work of TheMajinZenki (translation), Supper (hacking), cccmar (editing and testing), filler (original script dump), Xanathis (testing), and Oddoai-sama (testing). It’s the culmination of a series of translations of the Sorcery Saga series done mostly by the same group, with previous releases including Sorcery Saga Ⅱ, Ⅲ, and A for the Game Gear.

In a separate but related release, the group has collaborated with scanslator Novyal to produce a complete scanslation of the manual for Sorcery Saga Ⅲ, which is now bundled with the patch for that game. It can also be viewed on the patch’s web site: http://stargood.org/trans/madou3_manual.php

Additionally, a small unofficial patch for the 2010 English translation of the Game Gear version of Sorcery Saga Ⅰ has been released to fix hardware compatibility issues that prevented it from working properly when run on an actual Game Gear.

This will be the final release in this series of Sorcery Saga translations. The authors are grateful to everyone who’s played the translations, and hope this project has brought a little light to a woefully underrecognized series. Enjoy!

It's not a Puyo game, batankyu very much: Madou Monogatari A translation released

30 January 2020 3:59PM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

The Game Gear version of Compile’s classic dungeon crawler Sorcery Saga A (Madou Monogatari A) has been translated into English!

On the first day of her summer vacation from Magic Kindergarten, four-year-old magician-in-training Arle Nadja has decided to go visit her grandmother on the other side of the Fairy Forest. Since she’s such a big girl now, Arle is even allowed to go by herself! But on the way there, she comes across a strange man with wings and horns who wants to cut down the forest to build an amusement park. Determined to save her fairy friends’ precious forest, Arle sets out to put a stop to this heinous evildoing.

Sorcery Saga A: Vivacious Vacation (Madou Monogatari A: Doki Doki Vacation) is a prequel to the original Sorcery Saga trilogy, which is probably best known as the origin of the Puyo Puyo franchise. It was initially released for the PC-98 home computer in a three-game bundle with sister games Madou Monogatari R and S. Later, it was ported as a standalone title to the Sega Game Gear, which is the version this translation targets. As is typical for the series, this port bears only vague similarities to the original version; the story and dungeons are almost entirely new.

This patch was the work of filler (translation), Supper (hacking), TheMajinZenki (additional translation), cccmar (testing), and Oddoai-sama (testing). Special thanks goes to Kingofcrusher, who did the original hacking for the first Sorcery Saga game’s translation.

In addition to the main release, minor updates have also been made to the translation patches for Sorcery Saga II and III to fix bugs and keep messages shared among the games consistent.

With this patch, English translations now exist for all the Sorcery Saga games on the Game Gear. The authors still have more releases planned, though, so look forward to more Sorcery Saga!

Di-di-diacute, my darling: Madou Monogatari III translation released

30 December 2019 12:33PM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

Exactly 25 years after its release, Sorcery Saga III (Madou Monogatari III) for the Sega Game Gear has been translated into English!

Following the events of Sorcery Saga II, magician-in-training Arle Nadja and her new companion Carbuncle continue their journey to the Ancient Magic School. But trouble once more finds them on the road when they are mysteriously ambushed by Rulue, who declares her undying love for Satan and traps them in a labyrinth. Aided by the citizens of the Frog Empire, can Arle escape the Minotauros’s labyrinth and exact vengeance on Rulue?

Sorcery Saga III is the third in a series of dungeon crawlers developed by Compile, and probably best known as the origin of the Puyo Puyo puzzle game series. Originally released for Japanese home computers, the games were later ported to the Game Gear. These versions are generally quite different from the (as-yet-untranslated) computer versions; the third game in particular shares little with the original except a few characters, with the plot and dungeons almost entirely new for the port.

This translation patch was the work of TheMajinZenki (translation), Supper (hacking), cccmar (editing and testing), and Xanathis (testing). Thanks as well to Filler for originally dumping the game’s script, and to Kingofcrusher’s original work on the first Game Gear Madou Monogatari game.

The authors hope you’ll enjoy the game. Look forward to more Sorcery Saga in the future!

Master of mecha is pulling your strings: Chou Soujuu Mecha MG translation released!

23 September 2019 2:14PM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

A full English translation patch for the Nintendo DS game Chou Soujuu Mecha MG (Super Control Mecha MG) has been released!

In a world where giant robots known as Marionation Gear, or “Puppets”, are artisanally handcrafted in workshops, a certain boy serves as an apprentice at the Galouye Workshop, dreaming of becoming a “Puppeteer” (mecha pilot) and opening his own workshop with fellow apprentice Kay. But their peaceful daily life is shattered when the autonomous Puppets known as the Automen begin going on berserk rampages around the world. Together with new apprentice Anne-Marie, the hero and Kay are pulled into a conflict that could change the course of Puppet history…

Chou Soujuu Mecha MG is a 2006 mecha action game developed by Sandlot, the studio behind the Earth Defense Force series, and published by Nintendo. It combines the developer’s aptitude for larger-than-life spectacle with one of the most innovative and fun uses of the touch screen in the DS library: in addition to standard movement with the D-Pad, each of the game’s 100+ playable mecha has its own unique “cockpit” controlled with the touch screen. Players can pull levers to swing their robot’s arms and hurl buildings at the enemy, flip a switch to transform into a car, punch in launch codes to fire missiles, and countless other imaginative setups. With well over 100 missions, ranging from battle to racing to destroying burger joints, every mecha has a use.

Footage of the translation in action can be viewed here.

In addition to the patch, the game’s translator has scanslated several chapters of its tie-in manga adaptation, which can be viewed on the patch’s release website here.

This patch was the work of Supper (hacking), Phantom (translation and additional art), and cccmar (testing and editing). The authors hope you’ll enjoy this revival of one of the DS’s best-kept secrets.

But where's the Puyo!? Madou Monogatari II translation released

09 May 2019 6:08PM EST - Update by Supper

Translations News - RHDN Project Page

A long-overdue English translation for the second game in the Madou Monogatari (Sorcery Saga) series has been released!

Arle Nadja, last seen trying to graduate from kindergarten in the first Madou Monogatari, is now sixteen years old. As she journeys to the distant Ancient Magic School to study, a mysterious man with a remarkable proclivity for unintentional innuendo knocks her out and throws her in a dungeon! Arle must now use all her magic skills to escape and continue her quest to become the most powerful magician in the world.

The Madou Monogatari games are a series of dungeon crawlers by Compile, originally released for Japanese computers and later ported to many other platforms. They’re known for their distinct style of magic-oriented combat, with no HP or MP meters, individually-crafted attacks for every enemy, and prolific use of voice samples. They should also look very familiar to Puyo Puyo players – Puyo Puyo began as a spinoff of Madou Monogatari and imported most of its original cast from the series.

This patch is for the Sega Game Gear port of the game, which features somewhat different gameplay and dungeons from the original computer versions. Despite the Puyo Puyo connection and a solid reputation as a fun title, this marks the first English translation of the game, almost exactly 25 years after this version’s original release.

This patch was the work of TheMajinZenki (translation), Supper (hacking), cccmar (editing and testing), filler (original script dump), and Xanathis (testing). Special thanks goes to filler and Kingofcrusher for their translation patch for the first Madou Monogatari, whose font was reused for this patch.

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