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Pocket Monsters: Green Version

Game Boy

Game Description:

This was, along with Pocket Monsters Red, the first Pokemon games ever released. It is a little bit different, though. That is because it had some flaws that people complained about that were fixed in Pocket Monsters Blue, or the Pokemon Red and Blue that we got in the US.

The two main flaws with Green and Red are that a lot of the Pokemon’s sprite art looks odd and ugly looking, and there were many glitches, often gamebreaking.

There are some other flaws/things that were fixed/changed in the US releases, such as:

  • During Oak’s lecture at the start of the game, the Nidorino’s cry actually belongs to a Nidorina.
  • Missingno has an actual Pokedex entry, unlike in Blue where the entry is glitched up.
  • The pokemon only found through in-game trade were found in the wild in the Blue version.

I would recommend these games for those who wanted to see what Pokemon Red and Blue where when they were released in Japan, or if you want to disprove that Lavender Town creepypasta, or if you just want to glitch the hell out of this game. But I really suggest you just try the Japanese Blue version, or Gen 1’s North American releases.

Translation Description:

We all know about the international releases of Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue and the remakes of the Japanese Pokémon Red and Pokémon Green known as Pokémon FireRed and Pokémon LeafGreen as a worldwide release on the GBA. Japan did get a Pokémon Blue but the rest of the world did not get a Pokémon Green. For those hardcore fans that are curious enough to play the Japanese game, there is an English translation patch for Pokémon Green! The title screen has been updated, so the patch is complete now. Original Release date was 19 October 2007.

This patch is for a Pocket Monsters - Green Version (J) (V1.0) ROM. Pocket Monsters - Green Version (J) (V1.1) will not work. The file with [S] at the end is fine with this version.

Pokémon is Pocket Monsters in Japan.

ROM / ISO Information:

  • Green Version (J) (V1.0) ROM

Links:

Screenshots:


ROMhacking.net Patch ImagesROMhacking.net Patch ImagesROMhacking.net Patch ImagesROMhacking.net Patch Images

Credits:

Credits
ContributorType of contributionListed credit
LandaRHacking
WyndCrosserGraphicsTitle Screen Modification

User Review Information

Not Fully Translated, but So Very Close!

Reviewed By: Star on 24 Oct 2020

This is easily one of the best, if not THE best, translations of Pocket Monsters Midori (aka: Pokémon Green). I prefer it over the Pokémon Blue hack (which basically just “skins” it to look like Green) because it maintains all the original glitches of the original game. It also maintains the five character limit for names, just like it’s supposed to be. This is it. This is the real deal, and not a hack that simply tricks you into thinking you’re playing the Green version.

Unfortunately, although the translation description claims this to be complete, and the version number also seems to indicate a 100% translation (v1.0), the fact is the author of the translation missed a piece of dialogue between the main character and Professor Oak.

My review is, overall, positive. You can certainly play the full game to completion with this, and the translation is serious (not silly, like some others out there). However, I’d also like to make this a warning to anyone who may mistakenly believe this to be complete, as well as a request to any translators out there who may have an interest in finishing the job… it’s so close! Please, finish the translation!

I will now explain how to find the non-translated text.

After you get your starter Pokémon, battle your rival for the first time, and proceed with the quest to deliver a Parcel to Professor Oak, you will finally have access to buying Pokéballs. Which most people do, so they never find the non-translated conversation.

The secret is, do NOT buy any Pokéballs. At all. Instead, grind your starter Pokémon until he is strong enough to beat your rival’s team, on Route 22 (just West of Viridian City), by itself. After you defeat your rival, go BACK to Pallet Town and talk to Professor Oak… and you’ll find it. A whole conversation that never got translated. With this patch, you don’t even get the original Japanese symbols, just garbled text.

The conversation is relevant because you get free Pokéballs this way. IIRC, the conversation is basically Professor Oak explaining that you can’t trust just on your starter Pokémon to beat the game, and encourages you to go out and actually catch some new Pokémon, finishing with the gift of a few Pokéballs to get you started (maybe as a safety measure against the player wasting all his money on Potions or other items).

As I said, this is still the best translation ever made for this game, or at least one of them (as far as my knowledge goes), but it’s a shame that it is incomplete, and the way it’s described here may have discouraged others from having a go at a full translation.

The last update, according to this page, was July 2013, so, over seven years ago. This means it’s unlikely that the author will ever read this review, let alone proceed to make a “v1.1″ that is truly complete. My hope is that someone who has been tempted to translate this game will read this and realise there’s still a need for a 100% full translation of Pocket Monsters Midori.

I’ll take this opportunity to also remind potential translators that, AFAIK, no 100% translation was ever made for Pocket Monsters Aka (aka: Japanese version of Pokémon Red) or Pocket Mosnters Ao (aka: Japanese exclusive “Blue”), either – and the latter is actually quite important because it’s the only version of the game where you can legitimately acquire a Golem and a Gengar via in-game trades (no need to link with other games), and has a unique Pokémon distribution throughout Kanto.

I’d do it myself, but I have no idea how :/

Thank you for reading.

Version 1.0 Recommended - Yes

User Reviews
HeadlineAuthorDateVersionRecommended
Not Fully Translated, but So Very Close!Star24 Oct 20201.0Yes