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Author Topic: Picross 2 translation help  (Read 8237 times)

Zed

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Picross 2 translation help
« on: October 11, 2014, 01:54:07 pm »
I'm trying to get the Mario's Picross puzzles all translated before moving on to Wario's. I have 4 puzzles I would like to get some opinions on.

はいります This one I have translated as 'entrance.' The picture doesn't help me here.

These next ones look like they're names for Japanese myths. I did some Wikipedia research and did my best. I'd just like some reassurance these are right.

きんたろう Kintaro. I used "Golden Boy"

うらしまたろう Urashima Taro. I just used "Urashima." I couldn't find a more Anglicized name.

ももたろう Momotaro. I used "Peach Boy"

This is in the upper right corner of the Quick Picross screen. I have no idea what 'wanko' is supposed to mean.



Here are Mario's Quick Picross answers. I tried to Google Translate but it did not go well. Each letter in the phrase is a puzzle you have to solve. After solving all the puzzles the letters spell out a phrase or something. That's about all the context to these puzzle solutions I have.

 しちにんのさむがりや
 
 うまのみみにねんど
 
ふしぎのくにのアリババ

わがはいはねころんでいる

コンドルはとんびじゃない

しょうねんよたいしたもんだ

  マリオとワリカン
 
はなよりダンシングクイーン

ぼうずにくけりゃけさがため

いぬもあるけばぼうけんきぶん

やみつきになるのがピクルスだ

キノコといえば
     スーパーマーケット
     
ゆきのふるよはたのしい
        ペチャクチャ
       
マリオとルイージは
   いつもなかをたべたのか
   
やきゅうもすきだけど
      サッちゃんもすき
     
かきくえばかねがなくても
       なんとかなるさ
       
さるもきからおちるのを
      ニュートンはみた
     
うらのはたけでポチが
   なくなくはたらいている

おじいさんはやまに
 しばたさんをさがしにいった

Seihen

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2014, 01:46:23 am »
はいります This one I have translated as 'entrance.' The picture doesn't help me here.

Looks to me that the picture is of a geisha (?) welcoming two guests coming into a place/business. So, I think "Entrance" is probably accurate.

I'd say "Golden Boy" and "Peach Boy" are fine, but "Urashima" alone seems to be kinda missing the boat, as it were. Especially because its's about the man and not the place. Unfortunately, space is at a premium, so "Taro of the Inland Sea" isn't gonna work. At an absolute worst-case scenario, I still think something like "US Taro" would be a better name, though. Still not good...

This is in the upper right corner of the Quick Picross screen. I have no idea what 'wanko' is supposed to mean.

Cats meow and dogs bark in the west, and in Japan they nyan and wan, respectively. Nyanko and Wanko are cute names used to refer to a cat or a dog. Li'l Barky or Li'l Woofy, basically. Simply Dog would be fine, but not so much fun.

しちにんのさむがりや

This is a play on words from "The Seven Samurai," but instead is "The Seven Samugariya." "Samugariya" is a person who feels cold easily, the type who have a blanket on their lap right up until summer starts.

"Seven Freezing Friends" or something?
 
うまのみみにねんど

God, this stuff is obscure. Comes from the idiom "whispering prayers to a horse," to mean that it's a waste of time to bother to explain. See 馬の耳に念仏. But instead of prayer (nenbutsu), it's clay (nendo).

So, "putting clay on a horse's ear" or "clog up a horse's ear"

ふしぎのくにのアリババ

Finally one easier to understand! The Japanese title for "Alice in Wonderland," but reads "Alibaba in Wonderland" instead.

わがはいはねころんでいる

From the famous book by Soseki Natusme, "I am a Cat." But instead of cat (neko), it uses tumbling (nekorondeiru). So, "I am tumbling"

コンドルはとんびじゃない

Looks like a play on the Japanese title of the song El Cóndor Pasa. In Japanese it reads "A condor flies" (コンドルは飛んでいく), but replaces "flies" (tobu) with "not a black kite" (tobi ja nai). So, "A condor isn't a black kite" (a black kite is a time of bird).

しょうねんよたいしたもんだ

Sorry, dunno what the plan on words is here. Just means "boy's are quite a thing!"
Looks to be a popular phrase, but dunno the history of it.

マリオとワリカン

"Going Dutch with Mario," meaning to split the bill on dinner. Play on words, because to "go dutch" is called warikan, which sounds like wario.
 
はなよりダンシングクイーン

From the well-known Japanese phrase-turn-manga-turn-anime-turn-drama. "Hana yori dango" (boys/dumplings over flowers), meaning to want something practical over something simple like flowers. But instead of dango (dumpling, but "boys" in the manga title), dancing queen.
"Dancing queens over flowers."

ぼうずにくけりゃけさがため

From the phrase Hate a priest, and you will hate his very surplice., but instead of "...you will hate his very...," it's been replaced with a judo move, kesa-gatame. So, basically:
"Hate a priest and he'll take you down with a kesa-gatame"

いぬもあるけばぼうけんきぶん

やみつきになるのがピクルスだ

キノコといえば
     スーパーマーケット
     
ゆきのふるよはたのしい
        ペチャクチャ
       
マリオとルイージは
   いつもなかをたべたのか
   
やきゅうもすきだけど
      サッちゃんもすき
     
かきくえばかねがなくても
       なんとかなるさ
       
さるもきからおちるのを
      ニュートンはみた
     
うらのはたけでポチが
   なくなくはたらいている

おじいさんはやまに
 しばたさんをさがしにいった

Gonna leave the rest of these for now, but I think you can see that it's not really useful translating this, since they're mostly puns. From what I read in Japanese, it's the number of letters they're counting in the Japanese game, so you may just want to come up with your own random puns. This is the big difference between "translation" vs. "localization." I think rewriting would be more fun for English speakers here.

Zed

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2014, 10:17:10 am »
Thanks for the help! I suspected the Quick Picross ones weren't going to translate well. Not sure why they would put wanko up there meaning what it does. This game is weird. If I can find some space I might try "Urashima Taro." I'm debating replacing some of the puzzles with more western ones since I know how they're stored. Like you said, translation versus localization.

Pennywise

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2014, 11:49:39 am »
Ah, good old Japanese wordplay puns. They need to be localized or else the intended meaning will never come across to players. I would suggest trying to retain the spirit or idea of the original pun when localizing them.

I do have one suggestion, since The Magnificent Seven is the western version of Seven Samurai, you could do a wordplay on that instead. Something like "The Maleficent Seven."
« Last Edit: October 13, 2014, 12:13:56 pm by Pennywise »

neige

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2014, 06:25:18 pm »
しょうねんよたいしたもんだ
I'm not very good at Japanese but I think this may refer to a quote by William S. Clark, "Boys, be ambitious" or 少年よ、大志を抱け.

KingMike

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2014, 07:34:47 pm »
My guess is Nintendo would've replaced Momotaro, Kintaro and Urashima with some western fairytale characters, if it's possible (though I would guess that would require redrawing the puzzles).
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Seihen

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2014, 11:39:13 pm »
My guess is Nintendo would've replaced Momotaro, Kintaro and Urashima with some western fairytale characters, if it's possible (though I would guess that would require redrawing the puzzles).

I'd second this one. Though picross doesn't seem to have caught on much in the west, I feel like they would've pulled a Warioware (Wii-edition) and renamed/localized the ones of these that are really Japanese. Jack and the Beanstalk and the like, maybe?

Malias

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2014, 12:19:04 am »
I'd second this one. Though picross doesn't seem to have caught on much in the west, I feel like they would've pulled a Warioware (Wii-edition) and renamed/localized the ones of these that are really Japanese. Jack and the Beanstalk and the like, maybe?

Actually, Jack and the Beanstalk is already in the game :P.

While it would be great to localize all of the Japanese fairy tale puzzles, designing original puzzles is a lot harder than it sounds and goes beyond the scope of a straight up translation hack.  IMO they should be left as-is with an appropriate translation.
The great achievement is to lose one's reason for no reason, and to let my lady know that if I can do this without cause, what should I do if there were cause?
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contra

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2014, 04:48:05 am »
Yeah as a fan of the game and someone who'll definitely play this hack when it's done I'd say, don't redesign puzzles just for the sake of localization.

Zed

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2014, 03:53:48 pm »
Ah, good old Japanese wordplay puns. They need to be localized or else the intended meaning will never come across to players. I would suggest trying to retain the spirit or idea of the original pun when localizing them.

I do have one suggestion, since The Magnificent Seven is the western version of Seven Samurai, you could do a wordplay on that instead. Something like "The Maleficent Seven."

I like it. I will have to use that.

October 19, 2014, 02:32:08 pm - (Auto Merged - Double Posts are not allowed before 7 days.)

Time for some Wario puzzles translations! Any help is appreciated.

なにみてんのよ! Something like "What are you looking at!" maybe? It's a weird picture that kinda looks like the house is on fire to me.

かうまでうごかねぇぜ I really don't know. Something about buying. Looks like a dude in a ski mask showing a woman a trumpet.

だいもんじ I just went with "Daimonji." A Japanese festival where the form giant letters out of fire on a mountain.

The next four puzzles are part of a five puzzle mini-comic that's one half of stage. The first puzzle was easy to translate as "Mario's Picross." The next 4 were not.

のこりじかんが! He looks frustrated. May be running out of time.

おや,できたのかな? Really don't know.

あと2ふんちょうだい! Something about 2 minutes maybe. Bing thinks it's about poop which seems unlikely.

できた!あれみんなは? Probably cleared the puzzle. Wondering about more something.

These two are part of the background of the comic stage.
7月21日 seems to say August 21 but I don't know what the symbols on the bottom mean.

The left part says "issue" maybe. The middle is definitely "Picross." I have no idea what the right part says.

This is an entire level of Japanese words. They all seem to relate to Picross.

puzzlekanji thoughts
なんI went with "hard" though might use "difficult" if I have room
もんproblem, maybe puzzle since I've been using that instead of problem in some of the translations.
こくwin
ふくluck maybe "good luck"
limit
かんrules
せいtime, space maybe. This one and the next seem similar.
げんtime, hour. not sure.
おわりfinish
なやむworry
« Last Edit: October 19, 2014, 03:39:41 pm by Zed »

Seihen

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2014, 07:19:40 pm »
なにみてんのよ! Something like "What are you looking at!" maybe? It's a weird picture that kinda looks like the house is on fire to me.

Close! I admire your innocence. It's a peeping tom peeking in on a woman (possibly in the bath, see her arm over her chest). "What the hell are you looking at?!"
But it's a Mario game, so... your version works.

かうまでうごかねぇぜ I really don't know. Something about buying. Looks like a dude in a ski mask showing a woman a trumpet.

"I ain't goin' nowhere until you buy it."  There must be some sort of cultural background to this related to yakuza and door-to-door salesmen, but I think he's threatening to just basically stay there and be a hassle until she buys the product (vacuum?).

だいもんじ I just went with "Daimonji." A Japanese festival where the form giant letters out of fire on a mountain.

Yep, it's a festival that takes plate in Kyoto every year. It's pretty straightforward.

のこりじかんが! He looks frustrated. May be running out of time.

Literally means "the time left is...!" but since Japanese often implies the final verb, we can assume it means that time's almost up. "Time's almost up...!" or something.

おや,できたのかな? Really don't know.

Something like "Hey, I guess I did it?" or "Did I just pull it off?"
It's not clear if the text is from the player's point of view ("I did it!") or from the game's point of view ("You did it!"), so you'll want to conform the translation.

あと2ふんちょうだい! Something about 2 minutes maybe. Bing thinks it's about poop which seems unlikely.

Bing is a crime against humanity when it comes to Japanese translations. To be fair, 分 (part/minute/hundreds of other words) and 糞 (poop) are both written as fun (ふん). That aside:
"Just give me 2 more minutes!"

できた!あれみんなは? Probably cleared the puzzle. Wondering about more something.

"I did it! Hey, where'd everyone go?"
So, he's been so absorbed in the game that all his friends/family got bored and left. The character at the bottom, ヒュー is the sound of wind blowing through something empty, kinda like a tumbleweed rolling past.

7月21日 seems to say August 21 but I don't know what the symbols on the bottom mean.

発売, meaning "for sale." So "For Sale on July 21"

The left part says "issue" maybe. The middle is definitely "Picross." I have no idea what the right part says.

"Picross Comic Monthly," supposed to be the name of a magazine of Picross comics.

This is an entire level of Japanese words. They all seem to relate to Picross.

Hmm.. yes and no. Each of these should actually be read as a kanji pair, with the whole mess kinda making a word/phrase.

難問 (nanmon) = difficult puzzles
克服 (kokufuku) = overcoming, conquering
制限 (seigen) = limit
時間 (jikan) = time
終脳 (shuunou) = telencephalon (guess they're implying brain growth?)

"Overcoming challenging puzzles within a time limit promotes brain development"

And people said my degree in Japanese history was useless. HA! I can answer questions about old Gameboy games.
 ... T_T my life is boring.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2014, 07:28:24 pm by Seihen »

Zed

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2014, 06:15:02 pm »
Close! I admire your innocence. It's a peeping tom peeking in on a woman (possibly in the bath, see her arm over her chest). "What the hell are you looking at?!"
But it's a Mario game, so... your version works.
I'll go with "Peeping Tom." I'd like to try to keep the spirit of the puzzles intact no matter how weird.

Quote
"I ain't goin' nowhere until you buy it."  There must be some sort of cultural background to this related to yakuza and door-to-door salesmen, but I think he's threatening to just basically stay there and be a hassle until she buys the product (vacuum?).
So "salesman" should work then.

Quote
Literally means "the time left is...!" but since Japanese often implies the final verb, we can assume it means that time's almost up. "Time's almost up...!" or something.

Something like "Hey, I guess I did it?" or "Did I just pull it off?"
It's not clear if the text is from the player's point of view ("I did it!") or from the game's point of view ("You did it!"), so you'll want to conform the translation.

Bing is a crime against humanity when it comes to Japanese translations. To be fair, 分 (part/minute/hundreds of other words) and 糞 (poop) are both written as fun (ふん). That aside:
"Just give me 2 more minutes!"

"I did it! Hey, where'd everyone go?"
So, he's been so absorbed in the game that all his friends/family got bored and left. The character at the bottom, ヒュー is the sound of wind blowing through something empty, kinda like a tumbleweed rolling past.
I'll have to see what I can do with that.

Quote
発売, meaning "for sale." So "For Sale on July 21"

"Picross Comic Monthly," supposed to be the name of a magazine of Picross comics.
That makes sense.

Quote
Hmm.. yes and no. Each of these should actually be read as a kanji pair, with the whole mess kinda making a word/phrase.

難問 (nanmon) = difficult puzzles
克服 (kokufuku) = overcoming, conquering
制限 (seigen) = limit
時間 (jikan) = time
終脳 (shuunou) = telencephalon (guess they're implying brain growth?)

"Overcoming challenging puzzles within a time limit promotes brain development"
That is interesting. Wario has all the weird stages. Too bad the resulting sentence only has 9 words. I guess one puzzle will have to be "a" or "the." :/

Quote
And people said my degree in Japanese history was useless. HA! I can answer questions about old Gameboy games.
 ... T_T my life is boring.
Exciting lives are overrated. Thanks for the help!  :cookie:

Seihen

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2014, 06:29:37 pm »
Hmm.. how about:

"Overcoming these challenging puzzles within time limits promotes brain development"

That's 10 words and a little less boring than "a."  But I'm sure you can move the words around a bit to make something more interesting!

takimata

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Re: Picross 2 translation help
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2019, 02:24:24 am »
Holy necroposting, Batman!

Since this is the only place in the whole interwebs asking this question, and it's one of my favorite references in a video game ever, I'd still like to clear this up ... even if it is five years too late:

This is in the upper right corner of the Quick Picross screen. I have no idea what 'wanko' is supposed to mean.

Some soba restaurants, predominantly in the Iwate area, allow you to take the "wanko soba" challenge. You will get a small bowl, enough for a mouthful of soba, and a waiter is standing by to immediately refill your bowl after you emptied it (usually in one gulp) until you decide to stop. The bowls are counted, and managing to eat a hundred bowls is regarded as a sign of manliness (I never asked what it reflects on women.)

The scene in Picross 2 reflects this: "Wanko" is printed on a restaurant curtain, a "waiter" is standing by to hand you another puzzle immediately after you finished one, and they are counted. I too have no good idea how to translate this properly without losing the reference. The literal translation for "wanko" -- "bowl" -- is not helpful either. But since the reference is probably lost to a western audience anyway, one could go with "trial", or "quick", and that would even fit in the five letters.