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Author Topic: Question for native english speekers  (Read 9627 times)

Skeud

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2013, 08:12:31 am »
Thank you very much.
Yeah. I also never got the difference between a toad and a frog either.
toad : crapaud
frog : grenouille
monkey : singe sans queue
ape : hominid├ęs

Of course we have different words!

Bregalad

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #21 on: May 04, 2013, 02:41:32 pm »
I have a new question.

What is the difference between to extend something and to expand something ?

I have never really noticed they were two different words for it, for ~10 years I've been speaking english I always interpreted this as the same word.

I also realised how funny those words are closely related in english :
God <-> good
devil <-> evil
« Last Edit: May 04, 2013, 04:04:00 pm by Bregalad »

danke

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #22 on: May 04, 2013, 04:37:36 pm »
Extend typically implies length. Expand typically implies all directions.

You can extend time, but you wouldn't expand it.

You can expand -and- extend a building.

Liquids expand when they freeze, but they don't extend.

As for extend and expand as adjectives, there's no real 'rule' to them. They are determined by context.

Though, in general, 'expand' has a larger impact in meaning that 'extend'. Compare a DVD release offering "expanded" or "extended" features. Expanded makes you think they are not only extended, but somehow enhanced in some other way.


tl;dr: extend = to lengthen. expand = to spread out.

FAST6191

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #23 on: May 04, 2013, 07:56:31 pm »
And just to be a bastard if you find yourself playing engineer then you could well find yourself calculating the extension of an item (and then probably the strain) as a result of its (probably thermal or nuclear) expansion.

As for similar words.... I have not often considered homonyms and etymology but to end on something punny I guess I have to say something like D'evil.