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Author Topic: Question for native english speekers  (Read 9640 times)

Bregalad

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Question for native english speekers
« on: April 07, 2013, 06:52:21 am »
What is the difference between an ape and a monkey ?

What is the difference between something mandatory, and something compulsory ?

What is the difference between the "final" and the "eventual" ?

What is the difference between something analog to something, and something similar to something ?

Why is there 2 synonymous words for everything ?

How do you feel about people from all countries learning especially your language ?

Gideon Zhi

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2013, 07:41:36 am »
What is the difference between an ape and a monkey ?
-> Species. Same as the difference between a frog and a toad.

What is the difference between something mandatory, and something compulsory ?
-> Mandatory is enforced. Compulsory is self-enforced.

What is the difference between the "final" and the "eventual" ?
-> Final always comes last. Eventual doesn't necessarily come last, it just comes later.

What is the difference between something analog to something, and something similar to something ?
-> This is a bit more subtle, but similar is a bit more vague. Red, blue, and yellow are all similar in that they're all colors, but they're not analogous to each other because they only share one property. Something analogous to something else has more than a few similarities. Sort of. This one is really hard to explain :/

Why is there 2 synonymous words for everything ?
-> Why not?

How do you feel about people from all countries learning especially your language ?
Good on 'em, and best of luck!

Jazz

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2013, 09:13:30 am »
What is the difference between an ape and a monkey ?


Does your language have the same word for both species?
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Bregalad

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2013, 09:17:38 am »
Thank you very much.

Quote
Does your language have the same word for both species?
Yeah. I also never got the difference between a toad and a frog either.

There is actual species names but they are only used when distinction between species are actually required.


Which leads me to my next question :
What is the difference between something required and something needed ?

PS :
What is the difference between :
"Pehaps we should do XXX"
and
"Mabye we should do XXX"
and
"We should possibly do XXX"
« Last Edit: April 07, 2013, 09:29:30 am by Bregalad »

Jazz

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2013, 10:02:49 am »
What is the difference between something required and something needed ?
These are used daily as the same thing. There is a technical difference however it's neither here nor there.
Needed could give a greater sense of urgency.

PS :
What is the difference between :
"Pehaps we should do XXX"
and
"Mabye we should do XXX"
and
"We should possibly do XXX"
They all suggest the same out come. Different ways of suggestion to an action.

I would use each one like this.

Maybe another passage could work better?

Perhaps we could try the other passages.

The left passage is quite possibly better than the right passage.

They are all a "suggestion" in a phrase but how/when you use them is when it would change. Keep in mind though. I often feel 'perhaps' is more direct that 'maybe'. 'Maybe' to me is more like questioning the suggestion.
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BRPXQZME

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2013, 11:58:03 pm »
What is the difference between an ape and a monkey ?
Apes don’t have tails. There are other differences, but that’s the one where people like to play “gotcha” the most.

Why is there 2 synonymous words for everything ?
In 1066, the duke of Normandy successfully invaded a backwater kingdom on a weak claim and while that was obviously a pretty good move for him because it means he got to be a king, and even a pretty good change for that particular kingdom’s standing in Europe in the long run, it meant the people who lived there spoke a very different language from the people who ran the place for the next few centuries. The language that came out of this by the 15th century or so was something like a mix.

That’s not where all the synonyms come from, but a really good proportion of them are a conflict between Anglo–Saxon and Greco–Latinate terms.
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Paul Jensen

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2013, 09:58:35 am »
What is the difference between something mandatory, and something compulsory ?

Well, "mandatory" is related to the word "mandate", which is a rule or a law. "Compulsory" is related to "compulsive", which means that some kind of force pushes a person to do something, and also "compel", which means to force somebody to do something.

My intuition tells me that "mandatory" implies that something is required because of a rule or law. "Compulsory" has another layer to it. There is a thing that is mandatory, and then somebody forces ("compels") somebody else to do that thing. For example, schools force their students to take certain subjects. Those subjects are often called "compulsory subjects".

Quote
What is the difference between the "final" and the "eventual" ?

"Final" is simply the last thing in a series of things. "Eventual" implies that the series of things is relatively large or takes a long time to occur. "Eventual" can also mean "inevitable" or "unavoidable".

Quote
What is the difference between something analog to something, and something similar to something ?

As far as I understand, "analog" means a close representation of something else. An example is "analog recording". "Similar" just means that two things share some (but not all) of the same properties. For example, thing A and thing B might have the same shape, but be different colors. They are similar, because they share some features, but they are not analogous, because neither one is meant to represent the other.

Quote
Why is there 2 synonymous words for everything ?

Because it makes language more engaging, enjoyable, and fun.  :D

Quote
How do you feel about people from all countries learning especially your language ?

I'm a professor who teaches English as a foreign language, and I love seeing my students' skills improve. English is hard, but so is every language in its own way.

HTH
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Eien Ni Hen

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2013, 11:39:51 am »
I'm a professor who teaches English as a foreign language, and I love seeing my students' skills improve. English is hard, but so is every language in its own way.

HTH

I'm curious as to how you explain English verb conjugation to your students. IIRC English has a ton of irregular verbs, whereas French has maybe 10 common ones and I think Japanese has even less than that.
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DarknessSavior

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2013, 01:36:20 pm »
Because it makes language more engaging, enjoyable, and fun.  :D
Besides. In Japanese, there's like six words for everything. :P

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Bregalad

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2013, 02:33:02 pm »
Quote
IIRC English has a ton of irregular verbs, whereas French has maybe 10 common ones and I think Japanese has even less than that.
I'm pretty sure there is more irregular verbs in my language (french). However, irregular verbs comes in "categories" rather than being completely irregular. Since I just use them naturally without thinking about it, it's hard to comment really on what is a regular or irregular verb.

German is probably one of the worst when it comes to irregular verbs. In fact it seems like there is more irregular than regular verbs.

Quote
Besides. In Japanese, there's like six words for everything.
Oh god...

Eien Ni Hen

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2013, 09:46:35 pm »
I'm pretty sure there is more irregular verbs in my language (french). However, irregular verbs comes in "categories" rather than being completely irregular. Since I just use them naturally without thinking about it, it's hard to comment really on what is a regular or irregular verb.

If you're interested, I found a chart of irregular English verbs. The chart says there are 211, but apparently those are just the "common" ones. It's been years since I studied French but I don't remember verb conjugation being nearly as crazy as it is in English.
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Bregalad

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2013, 09:38:05 am »
What is the most crazy in english is the verbs which are constant.

Like in
"I hit you."

Is it present or past ? There is no way to know. Would you guys read it as present or past ?
I often am tempted to invent something like "I hat you" or something like this, but no it does not exist.

Quote
It's been years since I studied French but I don't remember verb conjugation being nearly as crazy as it is in English.
$
Conjugue moi le verbe "s'asseoir" et on en reparle. >:D

Spoiler:
In fact, some verbs are so horrible to conjuge that we simply do it wrongly all the time when speaking naturally, and nobody cares.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2013, 10:37:57 am by Bregalad »

LostTemplar

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2013, 11:31:38 am »
I'm curious as to how you explain English verb conjugation to your students. IIRC English has a ton of irregular verbs, whereas French has maybe 10 common ones and I think Japanese has even less than that.

Most textbooks say that Japanese has two irregular verbs (行く and する), but then there are oddities like いらっしゃる→いらっしゃいます or 乞う→乞うて, so I'm not so sure it's that clear-cut.

I never thought of irregular conjugation as weird or difficult. In my opinion, it's exactly one of those things you naturally acquire when you read/listen to a lot of the language. Furthermore, in most cases, you are understood well enough even if you falsely conjugate an irregular verb regularly (interestingly enough, even a lot of Germans for example tend to favor regular conjugations for some traditionally irregular verbs nowadays). Well, I guess it can be annoying if you have to study them for class though...

Eien Ni Hen

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2013, 01:48:14 pm »
What is the most crazy in english is the verbs which are constant.

Like in
"I hit you."

Is it present or past ? There is no way to know. Would you guys read it as present or past ?
I often am tempted to invent something like "I hat you" or something like this, but no it does not exist.
$
Conjugue moi le verbe "s'asseoir" et on en reparle. >:D

I had to look at a conjugation table for it. That verb will now give me nightmares. :/

With "I hit you" I think most English speakers would read it as past tense. For present we would say "I am hitting you". I see your point, though. "Hit" is both the past and present tense of "to hit".
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eefara

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2013, 02:54:23 pm »
What is the most crazy in english is the verbs which are constant.

Like in
"I hit you."

Is it present or past ? There is no way to know. Would you guys read it as present or past ?

Yep, I read it as past tense right off the bat for the same reason as Eien- it would sound odd to say that as present tense in English. "I am hitting you" would sound more natural.

geishaboy

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2013, 06:39:49 pm »
Strictly speaking "I am hitting you" is the present continuous form of the verb. That's like the only thing I remember from taking a bullshit English teaching course called CELTA. What a waste of money.

But yeah, I too would think "I hit you" is past tense. But it can just as easily be used as the present tense. Context is key.

danke

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2013, 08:53:48 pm »
Except that people would never really use "I hit you" in the present tense. I can't think of a single example scenario where they'd use that. They would you "I am going to hit you" or "I will hit you" followed by "I am hitting you" and then, when they were done, they'd use "I hit you".

And that's probably why the conjugation is weird... because no one uses the word on its own to be bothered enough to 'fix' it. Language evolves over time, and so on.

geishaboy

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2013, 09:13:13 pm »
Except that people would never really use "I hit you" in the present tense. I can't think of a single example scenario where they'd use that. They would you "I am going to hit you" or "I will hit you" followed by "I am hitting you" and then, when they were done, they'd use "I hit you".

I guess that is a little difficult to put into the present tense. Maybe in the form of a question. "What happens if I hit you?" or as an answer to a question "When are you going to give up? - As soon as I hit you", maybe even as a statement "When I hit you, you'll know about it", though even those examples are a little iffy.
 

Bregalad

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2013, 02:53:10 am »
Then pehaps another example would be more suited, because I agree "I hit you" in present tense in its own does not make sense in english :

"I put fuel in my car"

can be both present and past, and could potentially be used for both.

FAST6191

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Re: Question for native english speekers
« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2013, 05:01:26 am »
"I put fuel in my car"

Pretty much always past tense if a native was to say it unless it was a question though a can at the beginning would be better or rattling off an instruction list ("I stop my car, I open my fuel cap, I put fuel in my car, I put a lit rag in fuel hole").

Edit- as for the ape and monkey thing we do have the word primate though technically it includes lemurs so maybe simian but I would not be surprised if someone that is not one for biology looked oddly at you for that.