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Author Topic: Japanese Translation Questions  (Read 130037 times)

DarknessSavior

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #60 on: December 30, 2010, 07:49:43 am »
Indeed they do. But!

http://eow.alc.co.jp/%E6%AD%BB%E3%81%AB%E7%89%A9%E7%8B%82%E3%81%84/UTF-8/
Oops. Sorry. I misread. I just got home from a three day trip in Tokyo, and I'm exhausted. ^^;

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SeekerOfPeace

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #61 on: December 30, 2010, 08:58:50 am »
Thank you.

This one is slightly off topic but:

I notice you guys use Denshi Jisho or Space ALC (I use Jim Breen) for your dictionaries; are there offline equivalents?

I use Gozoku but it's not quite as robust as I would want it to be.

I've Googled Japanese Dictionary Software but all I found is Atlas (and it's a translation software which leaves much to be desired).

I'm under the impression that there isn't any great bilingual dictionary software available as I've looked around a lot.

Any suggestions?

« Last Edit: December 30, 2010, 09:04:09 am by SeekerOfPeace »

Ryusui

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #62 on: December 30, 2010, 02:54:17 pm »
Try this.

http://www.physics.ucla.edu/~grosenth/jwpce.html

It has a built-in dictionary.
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BRPXQZME

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #63 on: December 30, 2010, 04:16:45 pm »
Progressive Waei (published by Shōgakukan) has a cute little example sentence for the phrase:

Quote
彼は死にもの狂いで逃げた|He ran [for dear life / ⦅口⦆like hell].

The latter is probably a better way of expressing the connotation of 物(もの) in front of certain adjectives (though depending on the adjective, the もの prefix can mean “somehow” or it can mean “truly”).

I use the dictionary app that comes with OS X, but Yahoo! Japan has a dictionary interface that lets you choose between the popular contemporary Japanese dictionaries. Don’t let the fact that the interface is in Japanese daunt you; it’s just a dictionary lookup and the autosuggest is pretty helpful when you aren’t sure whether the entry will involve kana or kanji, and the dictionaries it uses are pretty good.
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6Toushiro9

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #64 on: December 30, 2010, 10:41:37 pm »
Can someone translate this
I know its missing some parts but is it still readable?

Ryusui

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #65 on: December 30, 2010, 11:02:56 pm »
Why don't you learn katakana and read it yourself? Katakana is simple stuff - they all render into English words, anyway - and besides, you're hijacking someone else's topic.

The symbol at the end is almost missing entirely, but if I were to hazard a guess, I'd say the entire thing is フレームバースト - "Flame Burst".
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DarknessSavior

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #66 on: December 30, 2010, 11:11:50 pm »
Why don't you learn katakana and read it yourself? Katakana is simple stuff - they all render into English words, anyway
Not necessarily. Most katakana is English words. But you're not taking into account 和製英語 or any of the other languages katakana can be (most often French/German, from what I've seen).

But yes, katakana is usually very easy. And quit topic hijacking. D:

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Ryusui

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #67 on: December 30, 2010, 11:48:02 pm »
I know that. I'm just giving the guy the easy answer.

"Katakana renders into English words" means he can be lazy and just assume that if he runs into some horrible garglemesh of syllables, it'll resolve itself into a nice, simple English word once he's done pruning vowels.

"...except for some cases where it's used as emphasis" means he'll freak out and decide that even learning katakana is too difficult for him 'cause he'll "never" be able to tell the difference, and then we're back to giving him fish for the rest of his life.
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RedComet

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #68 on: December 31, 2010, 01:40:04 am »
"...except for some cases where it's used as emphasis" means he'll freak out and decide that even learning katakana is too difficult for him 'cause he'll "never" be able to tell the difference, and then we're back to giving him fish for the rest of his life.

And RHDN is neither your mom nor your girlfriend!
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6Toushiro9

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #69 on: December 31, 2010, 04:13:16 am »
Why don't you learn katakana and read it yourself? Katakana is simple stuff - they all render into English words, anyway - and besides, you're hijacking someone else's topic.

The symbol at the end is almost missing entirely, but if I were to hazard a guess, I'd say the entire thing is フレームバースト - "Flame Burst".
OK, and thanks

DarknessSavior

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #70 on: December 31, 2010, 08:01:55 am »
"...except for some cases where it's used as emphasis" means he'll freak out and decide that even learning katakana is too difficult for him 'cause he'll "never" be able to tell the difference, and then we're back to giving him fish for the rest of his life.

And RHDN is neither your mom nor your girlfriend!
Except you, RC. You're both. :P

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SeekerOfPeace

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #71 on: December 31, 2010, 10:58:33 am »
ただでさえ奴らは、我が情報をつぶしたがっている.
Even in the best circumstances, they want to destroy our information.


In the sentence above, what is the function of つぶ?I got grain from my dictionaries but I doubt it makes sense here.


粒 【つぶ】: grain

この状況でやれる部下情報部の中でお前をおいて他にない

状況; 情況 【じょうきょう】: situation; circumstances; state of affairs (around you)
部下 【ぶか】: subordinate person
情報部 【じょうほうぶ】: intelligence department; information bureau
御前; お前 【おまえ】: my darling; presence (of a high personage); you (sing); old fellow; my dear
他 【た】: other (esp. people and abstract matters)

The subordinates of this situation…
What does やれる stand for? I couldn’t find it in my dictionary.



« Last Edit: December 31, 2010, 11:30:53 am by SeekerOfPeace »

Paul Jensen

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #72 on: December 31, 2010, 11:23:12 am »
I notice you guys use Denshi Jisho or Space ALC (I use Jim Breen) for your dictionaries; are there offline equivalents?

These days I mostly use the Casio Ex-word versions Progressive, 広辞苑 (こうじえん), and 明鏡 (めいきょう). Progressive is especially great because it has lots of example sentences that cover a wide variety of usage, but the drawback is that it has fewer actual entries. I usually use 広辞苑 for obscure terms and idioms, or when I want to know the etymology of a word or phrase. 明鏡 is good all around, but I only use it if the explanation in 広辞苑 is too hard to understand.

I used to use Jim Breen's WWWJDIC a lot for single entries, but lately I only use the "Translate Words" feature.

I've also heard that Kenkyuusha makes a good set of dictionaries, but I've never owned one.

Happy New Year, by the way. :)

HTH
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Ryusui

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #73 on: December 31, 2010, 03:31:15 pm »
ただでさえ奴らは、我が情報をつぶしたがっている.
Even in the best circumstances, they want to destroy our information.


In the sentence above, what is the function of つぶ?I got grain from my dictionaries but I doubt it makes sense here.


粒 【つぶ】: grain

You're breaking up the sentence wrong. It's not つぶしたがっている, it's つぶしたがっている. つぶした (潰した) is the past tense of つぶす (潰す).

Quote
Already, they're working to sabotage our intelligence.

Quote
この状況でやれる部下情報部の中でお前をおいて他にない

状況; 情況 【じょうきょう】: situation; circumstances; state of affairs (around you)
部下 【ぶか】: subordinate person
情報部 【じょうほうぶ】: intelligence department; information bureau
御前; お前 【おまえ】: my darling; presence (of a high personage); you (sing); old fellow; my dear
他 【た】: other (esp. people and abstract matters)

The subordinates of this situation…
What does やれる stand for? I couldn’t find it in my dictionary.


Of course you couldn't. Like above, it's a conjugation of a verb, やる. Space ALC helped with おいて他にない.

Quote
Out of everyone having to work under these circumstances, you in the Intelligence Department have the hardest time of it.
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BRPXQZME

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #74 on: December 31, 2010, 06:32:24 pm »
Happy New Year, by the way. :)

HTH
You people and your living in the future :<

You're breaking up the sentence wrong. It's not つぶしたがっている, it's つぶしたがっている. つぶした (潰した) is the past tense of つぶす (潰す).
It’s actually つぶし+たがっている (eager to destroy).
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SeekerOfPeace

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #75 on: December 31, 2010, 11:06:12 pm »
Happy new year Paul and everyone else!

Quote
Of course you couldn't. Like above, it's a conjugation of a verb, やる.

I thought of the やる later on but came back after you replied.

Let’s see if I can understand this right.
やれる is a conjugation of the verb やる (to do). It is part of the first group (it’s not irregular and doesn’t end with either –iru or –eru unless it’s an exception).
So やるis part of the Godan verbs.
The suffix here is -れる

According to my grammar book, it is an ending which indicates potential: able to or can.
Now I don't really see where this fits in with your translation:
Quote
Out of everyone having to work under these circumstances, you in the Intelligence Department have the hardest time of it.
I don't see where a possibility of doing something fits in this translation. I'm not saying you're wrong or anything but it's just not obvious to me. Is it "having to work"?

About 潰す (to smash, to waste), is there any grammatical reason why it's not written in Kanji?

Ryusui

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #76 on: December 31, 2010, 11:31:58 pm »
I don't see where a possibility of doing something fits in this translation. I'm not saying you're wrong or anything but it's just not obvious to me. Is it "having to work"?

About 潰す (to smash, to waste), is there any grammatical reason why it's not written in Kanji?

Yes, I rendered it as "having to work" - it's not literal, but it sounds more natural. And no, there's no hard-and-fast rule why some words might be written with kanji and others not.
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BRPXQZME

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #77 on: January 01, 2011, 12:43:13 am »
Happy new year Paul and everyone else!

Quote
Of course you couldn't. Like above, it's a conjugation of a verb, やる.

I thought of the やる later on but came back after you replied.

Let’s see if I can understand this right.
やれる is a conjugation of the verb やる (to do). It is part of the first group (it’s not irregular and doesn’t end with either –iru or –eru unless it’s an exception).
So やるis part of the Godan verbs.
The suffix here is -れる

According to my grammar book, it is an ending which indicates potential: able to or can.
Now I don't really see where this fits in with your translation:
Quote
Out of everyone having to work under these circumstances, you in the Intelligence Department have the hardest time of it.
I don't see where a possibility of doing something fits in this translation. I'm not saying you're wrong or anything but it's just not obvious to me. Is it "having to work"?
It’s a medium-tough sentence. You picked a tough project :P

[1] この状況で…
In this/these situation(s),
[2] やれる部下は…
the capable one is [the (subject is) subordinate one who can do (something)]
[4] 〜をおいて他にない
none other than ______ [lit. other than (the direct object), nobody/nothing]
[3] 情報部の中でお前…
you out of the whole intelligence department. [lit. in the intelligence department, you]

Put it all together, phrase it more naturally, and it could come out something like “There is no one in Intel who does this better than you.”

This is not necessarily the meaning if the context is different. やれる is sometimes a reading of 破れる, which would certainly be different.

About 潰す (to smash, to waste), is there any grammatical reason why it's not written in Kanji?
It’s more normal not to, at least in normal prose. There is no rhyme or reason to this; it’s just best to go with the flow. One reason I like the Progressive dictionary is that its example sentences tend to reflect common practice pretty well. Of course, so does a Google search but whatev.
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Ryusui

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #78 on: January 01, 2011, 01:42:26 am »
Yeah...looks like I was completely freaking wrong. Oh, well. At least I learned how to do it right next time. :3
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BRPXQZME

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Re: Japanese Translation Questions
« Reply #79 on: January 01, 2011, 02:05:16 am »
It took me a while to look up an unambiguous explanation of を置いて他にない (note the timestamp difference? not all of that was video games ;) ), but I was forgetting to use all the tricks in my bag of tools, one of which is to search for rōmaji (this often has the added benefit of ensuring an explanation in English or translation into English, but sometimes it turns up nothing; sometimes you have to make it less specific, too). I blame this godawful headache I’ve been having.
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