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Messages - Starscream

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1




Out of nowhere - great :D

2
I heard of the Colour Genie before, but didn't know there was a dedicated emulator until just now. If you haven't tried it yet, you could check out MAME/MESS for it. It's supposed to support WAV directly, there's apparently also a generic cassette conversion tool, possibly debugging and other useful functions etc.

3


5. PS Vita
+Sharp pixels
-Uneven 256p horizontal sizing (the original displayed at 240p)

9. Saturn
-Stretched 320p resolution with heavy aliasing

No "p",  the p (rogressive) is relevant for vertical res. The mismatch in the case for the Saturn is horizontal (there's no 256 horizontal mode on that console).
With that in mind the description for the Vita version isn't entirely clear.

4
Gaming Discussion / Re: Next Generation's Romhacking
« on: May 06, 2019, 09:33:13 pm »
There's Super Robot Wars 64 and the two Nushi Tsuri titles I find personally interesting. Compared to Saturn and PS1, the amount of exclusive Japanese titles is really small, the 3DO might have more.

5
Gaming Discussion / Re: Emulation on Linux
« on: February 10, 2019, 08:18:26 am »
I've decided to dive a bit deeper into Linux after only fiddling around with live stuff occasionally.

Just how useful are old versions of distros for ancient hardware without persistent online access? I've turned a thin client into a Win98 SE machine, but I've found that e.g. a Knoppix distro from 2011 also would still run on it. There are also small distros like Tinycore, but from what I've read, they're not really for beginners.
Knoppix has the advantage that it comes on a DVD with a lot of programs right at the start.
It's Debian based. Is it just a matter of finding old compatible packages and the necessary dependencies? Basically, what determines compatibility for a distro?


6
What a way to start the new year.  My thanks to everyone involved.

7
Agreed it's criminally overlooked. David Shadoff is still working on Dead of the Brain. https://twitter.com/Shadoff_d/status/1045825936849960960?s=09

That's cool. It looks he'll only be able to insert a French script anytime soon though, bummer.

I hope there'll be the some news from the Legend of Xanadu next year, it's been a while.

8
Gaming Discussion / Re: Microsoft is outperforming Apple?
« on: November 28, 2018, 02:41:10 pm »
"IBM-PC compatible"  was mostly a thing because of other x86 computers which were PC-DOS (or MS-DOS) compatible through their own versions but not 100% compatible with the IBM PC.
HP for example even sold a machine with a touch screen !
Unlike in Japan, none of the incompatibles took off in the west, by the middle of the 80s it was clear that a x86 machine needed full compatibility.
In Europe, IBM's own machines didn't have that much impact at first and the home market was eventually shared with the Amiga and ST for a while, after the 8bit market became secondary. In the US, Amiga and especially ST were more niche and the Mac stronger. But the 68K machines were their own thing everywhere and faded out during the 90s.

9
Gaming Discussion / Re: The PS1 Classic
« on: November 28, 2018, 08:02:28 am »
Is anyone saying anything about the emulation quality, aside from this PAL issue?  I doubt there would be many complaints at all if it simply didn't have such a questionable selection of games.

Eurogamer mentioned that NTSC is also affected:
"Remarkably, even the NTSC games have issues. You can see that with the performance snapshot of R4 Ridge Racer Type 4 embedded below. Original hardware runs this title locked at 30fps with perfect frame-pacing - a new frame is delivered every two screen refreshes without fail. Running under emulation on the PlayStation Classic, not only are frames delivered with 'blips' adding some stutter, but there also appear to be performance dips too - which do not occur in the game running on original hardware. So even if Sony had delivered a full NTSC line-up, we'd still have problems with this product falling short of the quality delivered by the actual PlayStation"

https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-2018-playstation-classic-emulation-first-look


10
Gaming Discussion / Re: The PS1 Classic
« on: November 18, 2018, 06:04:58 pm »
I've burned PS1 discs at 8x to 16x without problems. Lots of things can affect how well burns work:
- drive of the console
- burner
- discs used



11
Gaming Discussion / Re: The PS1 Classic
« on: November 13, 2018, 12:28:58 pm »
But then the other question is, didn't Sony already have a decent PSOne emulator for the PSP?

Yes, but that's probably tailored towards the hardware including the MIPS architecture. The Classic probably uses an ARM CPU, and I guess they think PCSX-ReARMed is developed enough for their purpose.

12
ROM Hacking Discussion / Re: Japanese (Java) Mobile Phone Games
« on: November 12, 2018, 12:32:57 pm »
There's was definitely something of a phone cracking scene back when Nokia smartphones started to appear, but I wouldn't know of any place or person you could go to these days where you could benefit from that expertise.
Perhaps MAME devs have some clue, they should have contacts with people dumping various stuff.

13
Gaming Discussion / Re: Emulation on Linux
« on: October 29, 2018, 06:51:43 am »
Perhaps you have more luck with a dedicated live distro first, e.g. Lakka is based on Retroarch.

14
Gaming Discussion / CRT shaders - what's important for a GPU?
« on: August 17, 2018, 10:15:09 am »
I'm planning to drop an old (=cheap) low profile GT card into a small business PC and then use that for various retro-related stuff, it would be nice if could still use more than the most basic shaders.
What is important in this regard? E.g. one thing I noticed is that most cards on Ebay where I live come only with DDR3 RAM - combined with a 64bit Memory bus, that seems to cripple bandwith a lot, is that something that can have a lot of impact?

15
From the screens it looks like the party has has been reduced to five from six in the original. The English SNES port also has some notable bugs.
https://tcrf.net/Might_and_Magic_II_(SNES,_Europe)
I might not correctly remember that, but I believe the SNES port also has the combat changes that the Genesis port has. Characters can attack in that one regardless of their position, and they get attacked always in order, i.e. first character, second character etc. In the original computer games this was not the case as one would expect.

16
ROM Hacking Discussion / Re: SNES - Might and Magic Book 2
« on: July 08, 2018, 03:21:55 pm »
I'm relatively familiar with the original, I'm not having differences in mind like the interface which are obvious from the screenshots. I'm more curious about changes such as different dungeons etc. things you'd need a different walkthrough for.

17
ROM Hacking Discussion / Re: SNES - Might and Magic Book 2
« on: July 08, 2018, 08:28:13 am »
Yes, the Japanese game is different. I assume it's at least not as buggy as the PAL-release and the Genesis version.

 It would be great to see explained in detail what exactly the mentioned changes were compared to the original.


18
Gaming Discussion / Re: Taking Things Away In Hacks
« on: May 15, 2018, 04:31:21 pm »


Some said grinding counts. I find this odd as it takes no real skill, mathematical prowess, knowledge of the game or similar.


It think that depends on how the game is structured, it can be a bit more complicated if efficiency is a factor, which I would think it normally is. E.g. I recently decided to stop playing Disgaea 1 because the post game content requires too much time to be worth it, unless opting for a play style and focus I would not consider fun.


19
Personal Projects / Re: Steam Hearts (PC-98) English Translation
« on: April 12, 2018, 07:51:30 am »
Yes, currently it appears you can't get any Neo Kobe PC-98 files without a torrent client, from either there or private trackers.

20
Gaming Discussion / Re: The most original NES games?
« on: April 05, 2018, 03:23:12 pm »
Famicom Wars is in many ways similar to the earlier computer Daisenryaku games, a Famicom Daisenryaku was also released in 1988  just like Famicom Wars though. There's even a translation patch by AGTP.

I'm actually surprised after looking up Fire Emblem's release that it was so late, I always thought for some reason that it came out around 87/88.
But by 1990 there were probably quite a number of games known that fused turn based combat with RPG elements.

E.g. Julian Gollop of X-Com fame did something like this in his 1990 game Lords of Chaos.

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